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On the Change in the Austrian Business Cycle

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  • Sandra Bilek-Steindl

Abstract

This paper analyses the change in the Austrian business cycle over time using data back to 1954. The change in the cyclical pattern is captured using a non-linear univariate structural time series model where the time of the break point is estimated. Results for GDP series suggest a break in the frequency of the cycle and in the parameter covering the variance of the disturbances of the cycle taking place in the mid 1970s and early 1980s, respectively. Using data for GDP components a break in these variables is found too, but the timing of the break differs among the series. In a further step the paper assesses the relevance of these findings for forecasting purposes. It is shown that during certain periods the out-of-sample forecasting performance of GDP does improve when a break in one of the two parameters is explicitly modelled.

Suggested Citation

  • Sandra Bilek-Steindl, 2012. "On the Change in the Austrian Business Cycle," OECD Journal: Journal of Business Cycle Measurement and Analysis, OECD Publishing, Centre for International Research on Economic Tendency Surveys, vol. 2012(1), pages 1-18.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:stdkab:5k9159fnz8kg
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/jbcma-2012-5k9159fnz8kg
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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Brunhart, 2013. "Der Klein(st)staat Liechtenstein und seine grossen Nachbarländer: Eine wachstums- und konjunkturanalytische Gegenüberstellung," Arbeitspapiere 44, Liechtenstein-Institut.
    2. Susanne Bärenthaler-Sieber & Sandra Bilek-Steindl & Christian Glocker, 2013. "Trade Synchronisation During Major Economic Crises," WIFO Working Papers 449, WIFO.

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