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Ongoing changes in the business cycle - evidence and causes

  • Morten Balling
    ()

Registered editor(s):
  • Thomas Dalsgaard
  • Jørgen Elmeskov
  • Cyn-Young Park

This paper first reviews a number of stylised facts concerning OECD country business cycles over the past four decades. In general, the amplitude of business cycles has fallen, driven mainly by declining fluctuations of domestic demand. As a result, international divergencies of cyclical positions have diminished but, outside the euro area, there is little evidence of increased synchronisation of cycles. The paper then reviews a number of influences on business cycles. The evidence suggests that, on balance, features of macroeconomic policies may have tended to reduce cyclical volatility and structural changes, notably the increased share of the service sector in the economies, have also tended to dampen the cycle. More recently, there are signs that financial market prices have increasingly moved in sympathy across countries, and the final section of the paper illustrates how this could affect the international transmission of cyclical shocks and the associated need for policy response.

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This book is provided by SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum in its series SUERF Studies with number 20 and published in 2002.
ISBN: 978-3-902109-12-5
Handle: RePEc:erf:erfstu:20
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  1. Nelson, Charles R & Kang, Heejoon, 1981. "Spurious Periodicity in Inappropriately Detrended Time Series," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(3), pages 741-51, May.
  2. Cem Karacadag & Michael W. Taylor, 2000. "The New Capital Adequacy Framework - Institutional Constraints and Incentive Structures," SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum, number 8 edited by Morten Balling, November.
  3. Wynne, Mark A & Koo, Jahyeong, 2000. "Business Cycles under Monetary Union: A Comparison of the EU and US," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 67(267), pages 347-74, August.
  4. Pete Richardson & Laurence Boone & Claude Giorno & Mara Meacci & David Rae & David Turner, 2000. "The Concept, Policy Use and Measurement of Structural Unemployment: Estimating a Time Varying NAIRU Across 21 OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 250, OECD Publishing.
  5. Paul van den Noord, 2000. "The Size and Role of Automatic Fiscal Stabilizers in the 1990s and Beyond," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 230, OECD Publishing.
  6. John Calverley & Sarah Hewin & Kevin Grice, 2000. "Emerging Stock Markets After the Crisis," Chapters in SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum.
  7. Rolf Skog, 1997. "Does Sweden Need a Mandatory Bid Rule? A critical analysis," Chapters in SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum.
  8. Peter R Haiss & Gerhard Fink, 1998. "Seven Years of Financial Market Reform in Central Europe," Chapters in SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum.
  9. George M. von Furstenberg & Bang Nam Jeon, 1989. "International Stock Price Movements: Links and Messages," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 20(1), pages 125-180.
  10. Eun, Cheol S. & Shim, Sangdal, 1989. "International Transmission of Stock Market Movements," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(02), pages 241-256, June.
  11. Claude Giorno & Pete Richardson & Deborah Roseveare & Paul van den Noord, 1995. "Estimating Potential Output, Output Gaps and Structural Budget Balances," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 152, OECD Publishing.
  12. Gabriele Galati & Kostas Tsatsaronis, 2001. "The impact of the euro on Europe's financial markets," BIS Working Papers 100, Bank for International Settlements.
  13. George Gelauff & Corina den Broeder, 1997. "Governance of stakeholder relationships: The German and Dutch experience," Chapters in SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum.
  14. Alan Manning, 1992. "Productivity Growth, Wage Setting and the Equilibrium Rate of Unemployment," CEP Discussion Papers dp0063, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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