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Unemployment, Public Pensions, and Capital Accumulation: Assessing Growth Effects of Alternative Funding Strategies

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  • Joachim Thøgersen

Abstract

The paper develops an overlapping-generations model that interacts with a labor market characterized by equilibrium unemployment. This structure implies that young individuals can be in two different states, employed or unemployed. Hence, the social security system contains both old-age benefits and unemployment insurance. Including these features, the model seeks to assess growth effects of three different pension systems: one unfunded and two funded, where the distinction is made between actuarial and nonactuarial funding strategies. It is shown that both funded systems generate higher growth than an unfunded system. Moreover, the actuarial system fosters higher growth than the nonactuarial.

Suggested Citation

  • Joachim Thøgersen, 2010. "Unemployment, Public Pensions, and Capital Accumulation: Assessing Growth Effects of Alternative Funding Strategies," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 166(3), pages 502-520, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:mhr:jinste:urn:sici:0932-4569(201009)166:3_502:uppaca_2.0.tx_2-e
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pascal Belan & Philippe Michel & Pierre Pestieau, 1998. "Pareto-Improving Social Security Reform," The Geneva Risk and Insurance Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics (The Geneva Association), vol. 23(2), pages 119-125, December.
    2. Lambrecht, Stephane & Michel, Philippe & Vidal, Jean-Pierre, 2005. "Public pensions and growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(5), pages 1261-1281, July.
    3. Barro, Robert J, 1979. "On the Determination of the Public Debt," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 940-971, October.
    4. Francesco Daveri & Guido Tabellini, 2000. "Unemployment, growth and taxation in industrial countries," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 15(30), pages 47-104, April.
    5. Brauninger, Michael & Pannenberg, Markus, 2002. "Unemployment and productivity growth: an empirical analysis within an augmented Solow model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 105-120, January.
    6. Grossman, Gene M. & Yanagawa, Noriyuki, 1993. "Asset bubbles and endogenous growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 3-19, February.
    7. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1962. "The Economic Implications of Learning by Doing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(3), pages 155-173.
    8. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Stanley Fischer, 1989. "Lectures on Macroeconomics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262022834, January.
    9. Johannes Holler, 2007. "Pension Systems and their Influence on Fertility and Growth," Vienna Economics Papers 0704, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    10. Bohn, Henning, 1992. "Endogenous Government Spending and Ricardian Equivalence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(412), pages 588-597, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kunze, Lars, 2012. "Funded social security and economic growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 180-183.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J51 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effects
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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