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Global or Domestic? Which Shocks Drive Inflation in European Small Open Economies?

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  • Aleksandra Hałka
  • Jacek Kotłowski

Abstract

We investigate which shocks drive inflation in small open economies. In the first step, we use the structural vector autoregressive (SVAR) approach to identify the global shocks. Second, we regress the disaggregated price indices for selected European economies on the global shocks controlling for the domestic variables. We find that the fluctuations of inflation in the analyzed countries are to large extent determined by the cyclical movements of the domestic output gap however the commodity shock also contributes strongly to inflation variability. The role of the non-commodity global supply shock is less prominent, however, interpreted to some extent as a globalization shock, for most of the analyzed period lowers the inflation. Nonetheless, in the aftermath of the global financial crisis, this shock reversed what may be interpreted as the weakening of the globalization process.

Suggested Citation

  • Aleksandra Hałka & Jacek Kotłowski, 2017. "Global or Domestic? Which Shocks Drive Inflation in European Small Open Economies?," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(8), pages 1812-1835, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:emfitr:v:53:y:2017:i:8:p:1812-1835
    DOI: 10.1080/1540496X.2016.1193001
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    Cited by:

    1. Karol Szafranek & Aleksandra Hałka, 2017. "Determinants of low inflation in an emerging, small open economy. A comparison of aggregated and disaggregated approaches," NBP Working Papers 267, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    2. Potjagailo, Galina, 2016. "Spillover effects from euro area monetary policy across the EU: A factor-augmented VAR approach," Kiel Working Papers 2033, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Jašová, Martina & Moessner, Richhild & Takáts, Előd, 2020. "Domestic and global output gaps as inflation drivers: What does the Phillips curve tell?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 238-253.
    4. Gregor Bäurle & Matthias Gubler & Diego R. Känzig, 2017. "International inflation spillovers - the role of different shocks," Working Papers 2017-07, Swiss National Bank.
    5. Hałka, Aleksandra & Leszczyńska-Paczesna, Agnieszka, 2019. "Price convergence in the European Union – What has changed?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 226-241.
    6. Jarko Fidrmuc & Katarína Danišková, 2020. "Meta-Analysis of the New Keynesian Phillips Curve in Developed and Emerging Economies," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 56(1), pages 10-31, January.
    7. Paweł Gajewski, 2017. "Sources of Regional Inflation in Poland," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 55(3), pages 261-276, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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