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Spatial Autocorrelation in Spatial Interactions Models: Geographic Scale and Resolution Implications for Network Resilience and Vulnerability

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  • Daniel Griffith

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  • Yongwan Chun

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Abstract

This paper addresses the theme of spatial autocorrelation impacting spatial equilibria, and hence an understanding of economic network resilience and vulnerability. It exploits the notion that spatial autocorrelation in the geographic distribution of origin and destination attributes and network autocorrelation in the flows between origins and destinations constitute two spatial autocorrelation components contained in spatial interaction data. It illustrates that a spatial interaction model specification needs to incorporate both components in order to furnish sound implications about associated economic network resilience and vulnerability. Such models also need to undergo sensitivity analyses in terms of changes in geographic scale and resolution. And, it furnishes a novel 3-D visualization of geographic flows, such as journey-to-work trips, in order to achieve a better comprehension of economic network resilience and vulnerability. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Griffith & Yongwan Chun, 2015. "Spatial Autocorrelation in Spatial Interactions Models: Geographic Scale and Resolution Implications for Network Resilience and Vulnerability," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 337-365, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:netspa:v:15:y:2015:i:2:p:337-365
    DOI: 10.1007/s11067-014-9256-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel P. McMillen, 2004. "Employment Densities, Spatial Autocorrelation, and Subcenters in Large Metropolitan Areas," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(2), pages 225-244, May.
    2. Aura Reggiani & Thomas de Graaff & Peter Nijkamp, 2001. "Resilience: An Evolutionary Approach to Spatial Economic Systems," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 01-100/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Aura Reggiani & Pietro Bucci & Giovanni Russo, 2011. "Accessibility and Network Structures in the German Commuting," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 621-641, December.
    4. ., 2014. "The Smithian inheritance," Chapters, in: Economists and the State, chapter 1, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. James P. LeSage & R. Kelley Pace, 2008. "Spatial Econometric Modeling Of Origin‚ÄźDestination Flows," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(5), pages 941-967, December.
    6. Reggiani, Aura, 2013. "Network resilience for transport security: Some methodological considerations," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 63-68.
    7. Schelling, Thomas C, 1969. "Models of Segregation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 488-493, May.
    8. Roberto Patuelli & Aura Reggiani & Sean Gorman & Peter Nijkamp & Franz-Josef Bade, 2007. "Network Analysis of Commuting Flows: A Comparative Static Approach to German Data," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 315-331, December.
    9. Michael Batty, 2013. "Resilient cities, networks, and disruption," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 40(4), pages 571-573, July.
    10. Charles Perrings, 1998. "Resilience in the Dynamics of Economy-Environment Systems," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 11(3), pages 503-520, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel A. Griffith & Manfred M. Fischer & James LeSage, 2017. "The spatial autocorrelation problem in spatial interaction modelling: a comparison of two common solutions," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 75-86, March.
    2. repec:kap:netspa:v:19:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s11067-018-9395-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:kap:netspa:v:18:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11067-017-9375-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:kap:netspa:v:19:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s11067-017-9382-x is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:kap:netspa:v:18:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11067-018-9391-4 is not listed on IDEAS

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