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Spatial Econometric Modeling Of Origin-Destination Flows


  • James P. LeSage
  • R. Kelley Pace


Standard spatial autoregressive models rely on spatial weight structures constructed to model dependence among "n" regions. Ways of parsimoniously modeling the connectivity among the sample of "N"="n"-super-2 origin-destination (OD) pairs that arise in a closed system of interregional flows has remained a stumbling block. We overcome this problem by proposing spatial weight structures that model dependence among the "N" OD pairs in a fashion consistent with standard spatial autoregressive models. This results in a family of spatial OD models introduced here that represent an extension of the spatial regression models described in Anselin (1988). Copyright (c) 2008, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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  • James P. LeSage & R. Kelley Pace, 2008. "Spatial Econometric Modeling Of Origin-Destination Flows," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(5), pages 941-967.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:48:y:2008:i:5:p:941-967

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. A. Porojan, 2001. "Trade Flows and Spatial Effects: The Gravity Model Revisited," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 265-280, July.
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    9. Griffith, Daniel A., 2007. "Spatial Structure and Spatial Interaction: 25 Years Later," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 37(1), pages 28-38.
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    11. D A Griffith & K G Jones, 1980. "Explorations into the Relationship between Spatial Structure and Spatial Interaction," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 12(2), pages 187-201, February.
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