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In the mood to buy? Understanding the interplay of mood regulation and congruence in an international context

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  • Erik Maier

    ()

  • Robert Wilken

    ()

  • Helmut Schneider

    ()

  • Gülpınar Kelemci Schneider

    ()

Abstract

Literature reports different effects of mood on measures of consumer behavior. Either mood congruence or mood regulation theories serve to explain these effects, though the latter theory is perhaps more sophisticated. This research goes a step further: in a sequence of four studies, the authors consider different products (with and without mood-lifting capabilities) and consumers’ beliefs in the transience of their mood to illuminate the interplay between the two theoretical approaches. Culture (individualism vs. collectivism) emerges as an important driver of mood transience. Mood transience drives the likelihood of mood regulation through the consumption of products with mood-lifting capabilities. Willingness to pay serves as the dependent variable, in contrast with mood research that has focused almost entirely on nonmonetary forms of consumer behavior. Greater willingness to pay variance in bad moods, compared with good moods, offers evidence of the opposing effects of mood congruence and regulation. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Erik Maier & Robert Wilken & Helmut Schneider & Gülpınar Kelemci Schneider, 2012. "In the mood to buy? Understanding the interplay of mood regulation and congruence in an international context," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 1005-1018, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:mktlet:v:23:y:2012:i:4:p:1005-1018
    DOI: 10.1007/s11002-012-9200-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maria Pollai & Erik Hoelzl & Flavia Possas, 2010. "Consumption-related emotions over time: Fit between prediction and experience," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 397-411, December.
    2. Jayson Lusk & Leatta McLaughlin & Sara Jaeger, 2007. "Strategy and response to purchase intention questions," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 31-44, June.
    3. Franziska Voelckner, 2006. "An empirical comparison of methods for measuring consumers’ willingness to pay," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 137-149, April.
    4. Gardner, Meryl Paula, 1985. "Mood States and Consumer Behavior: A Critical Review," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(3), pages 281-300, December.
    5. Swinyard, William R, 1993. "The Effects of Mood, Involvement, and Quality of Store Experience on Shopping Intentions," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(2), pages 271-280, September.
    6. Anne Coughlan & S. Choi & Wujin Chu & Charles Ingene & Sridhar Moorthy & V. Padmanabhan & Jagmohan Raju & David Soberman & Richard Staelin & Z. Zhang, 2010. "Marketing modeling reality and the realities of marketing modeling," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 317-333, September.
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