IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/jtecht/v42y2017i1d10.1007_s10961-015-9460-5.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

On-ramping: following women scientists and engineers through their transition from nonacademic to faculty careers

Author

Listed:
  • Coleen Carrigan

    () (California State Polytechnic University)

  • Katie O’Leary

    (University of Washington)

  • Eve Riskin

    (University of Washington)

  • Joyce Yen

    (University of Washington)

  • Matt O’Donnell

    (University of Washington)

Abstract

Abstract A popular strategy for increasing women faculty in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) departments is to hire from other universities, but this strategy fails to increase the number of women faculty nationally. This research investigates a new approach to faculty recruitment called “on-ramping,” the process by which women with PhDs leverage their nonacademic careers and enter academia as faculty members. This study follows women scientists and engineers from their non-academic to faculty career and analyzes their experiences transgressing the boundaries of STEM knowledge production sites. We used qualitative methods to collect and analyze semi-structured interviews about the experiences of ten female PhDs who successfully on-ramped into faculty positions with the support of a feminist professional community. Our data revealed four phases of on-ramping that characterized the transition to academia for our participants. Attention to gender in on-ramping also highlights concerns that span the personal and the professional in women scientists and engineers’ lives. By illuminating cultural and political practices in STEM sites of knowledge production and the effects of feminist interventions on women’s experiences of producing knowledge in STEM fields, this study offers a unique perspective that can elucidate the strengths and weaknesses of these sites, especially in regards to gender politics and knowledge production.

Suggested Citation

  • Coleen Carrigan & Katie O’Leary & Eve Riskin & Joyce Yen & Matt O’Donnell, 2017. "On-ramping: following women scientists and engineers through their transition from nonacademic to faculty careers," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 98-115, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:42:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10961-015-9460-5
    DOI: 10.1007/s10961-015-9460-5
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10961-015-9460-5
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Price, Joshua, 2010. "The effect of instructor race and gender on student persistence in STEM fields," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 901-910, December.
    2. Scott E. Carrell & Marianne E. Page & James E. West, 2010. "Sex and Science: How Professor Gender Perpetuates the Gender Gap," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(3), pages 1101-1144.
    3. Bozeman, Barry & Gaughan, Monica, 2007. "Impacts of grants and contracts on academic researchers' interactions with industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 694-707, June.
    4. Michael Fritsch & Stefan Krabel, 2012. "Ready to leave the ivory tower?: Academic scientists’ appeal to work in the private sector," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 271-296, June.
    5. Michelle Sheran Sylvester, 2007. "The Career and Family Choices of Women: A Dynamic Analysis of Labor Force Participation, Schooling, Marriage and Fertility Decisions," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(3), pages 367-399, July.
    6. Robst, John & Keil, Jack & Russo, Dean, 1998. "The effect of gender composition of faculty on student retention," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 429-439, October.
    7. Elizabeth Corley & Monica Gaughan, 2005. "Scientists’ Participation in University Research Centers: What are the Gender Differences?," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 371-381, October.
    8. Dietz, James S. & Bozeman, Barry, 2005. "Academic careers, patents, and productivity: industry experience as scientific and technical human capital," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 349-367, April.
    9. Mary Fox & Wenbin Xiao, 2013. "Perceived chances for promotion among women associate professors in computing: individual, departmental, and entrepreneurial factors," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 135-152, April.
    10. Jerry Thursby & Marie Thursby, 2005. "Gender Patterns of Research and Licensing Activity of Science and Engineering Faculty," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 343-353, October.
    11. Paula Stephan & Asmaa El-Ganainy, 2007. "The entrepreneurial puzzle: explaining the gender gap," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 32(5), pages 475-487, October.
    12. Mary Fox & Carol Colatrella, 2006. "Participation, Performance, and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering: What is at Issue and Why," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 377-386, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Women faculty; STEM; Gender; Knowledge economy; Feminism; Career path; University-industry partnerships;

    JEL classification:

    • O35 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Social Innovation
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:42:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10961-015-9460-5. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Mallaigh Nolan). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.