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Participation, Performance, and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering: What is at Issue and Why

Author

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  • Mary Fox

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  • Carol Colatrella

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Abstract

Using multi-staged methods developed in this research for coding/analysis of interview data, this article portrays women’s reported experiences of participation, performance, and advancement in academic science and engineering in a major technological institution. The methods and findings have implications for understanding the complexity underlying women’s participation and performance, and for practices and policies to support advancement of women faculty, particularly those in research universities. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Suggested Citation

  • Mary Fox & Carol Colatrella, 2006. "Participation, Performance, and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering: What is at Issue and Why," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 377-386, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:31:y:2006:i:3:p:377-386
    DOI: 10.1007/s10961-006-7209-x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gonzalez-Brambila, Claudia & Veloso, Francisco M., 2007. "The determinants of research output and impact: A study of Mexican researchers," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1035-1051, September.
    2. Mary Fox & Wenbin Xiao, 2013. "Perceived chances for promotion among women associate professors in computing: individual, departmental, and entrepreneurial factors," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 135-152, April.
    3. Cruz-Castro, Laura & Sanz-Menéndez, Luis, 2010. "Mobility versus job stability: Assessing tenure and productivity outcomes," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 27-38, February.
    4. Xuhong Su & Barry Bozeman, 2016. "Family Friendly Policies in STEM Departments: Awareness and Determinants," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 57(8), pages 990-1009, December.
    5. Aïcha Serghini Idrissi & Patricia Garcia-Prieto Sol, 2009. "Gendering models of leading academic performance (LAP): The role of social identity, prototypicality and social identity performance in female academic careers," Working Papers CEB 09-030.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    6. Coleen Carrigan & Katie O’Leary & Eve Riskin & Joyce Yen & Matt O’Donnell, 2017. "On-ramping: following women scientists and engineers through their transition from nonacademic to faculty careers," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 98-115, February.
    7. Cindy L. Cain & Erin Leahey, 2014. "Cultural Correlates of Gender Integration in Science," Gender, Work and Organization, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(6), pages 516-530, November.
    8. Jeannette Colyvas & Kaisa Snellman & Janet Bercovitz & Maryann Feldman, 2012. "Disentangling effort and performance: a renewed look at gender differences in commercializing medical school research," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 478-489, August.
    9. Amanda M. Kulp, 2020. "Parenting on the Path to the Professoriate: A Focus on Graduate Student Mothers," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 61(3), pages 408-429, May.
    10. Su, Xuhong, 2014. "Academic scientists’ affiliation with university research centers: Selection dynamics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 382-390.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    women; science; engineering; participation; performance; I-23; L-39;

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