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Active versus passive academic networking: evidence from micro-level data

Listed author(s):
  • Rajeev Goel

    ()

  • Christoph Grimpe

    ()

This paper examines determinants of networking by academics. Using information from a unique large survey of German researchers, the key contribution focuses on the active versus passive networking distinction. Is active networking by researchers a substitute or a complement to passive networking? Other contributions include examining the role of geographic factors in networking and whether research bottlenecks affect a researcher’s propensity to network. Are the determinants of European conference participation by German researchers different from conferences in rest of the world? Results show that some types of passive academic networking are complementary to active networking, while others are substitute. Further, we find differences in factors promoting participation in European conferences versus conferences in rest of the world. Finally, publishing bottlenecks as a group generally do not appear to be a hindrance to active networking. Implications for academic policy are discussed. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (outside the USA) 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10961-011-9236-5
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Article provided by Springer in its journal The Journal of Technology Transfer.

Volume (Year): 38 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 116-134

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:38:y:2013:i:2:p:116-134
DOI: 10.1007/s10961-011-9236-5
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/business+%26+management/journal/10961/PS2

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