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Social distance versus spatial distance in R&D cooperation: Empirical evidence from European collaboration choices in micro and nanotechnologies

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  • Corinne Autant‐Bernard
  • Pascal Billand
  • David Frachisse
  • Nadine Massard

Abstract

. Spurred on by the theory of network formation, and by the geography of innovation, traditional analyses on R&D cooperation face a deep renewal. This paper assesses the extent to which these renewals find an empirical validation. Based on the research projects submitted to the 6th Framework Program of the European Union, a binary choice model is used in order to highlight the existence of network and spatial effects alongside other microeconomic determinants of cooperation. Our findings suggest that network effects are present, so that probability of collaboration is influenced by each individual's position within the network. Social distance thus seems to matter more than geographical distance. Abstract. Los análisis tradicionales de cooperación I+D se enfrentan a una renovación profunda, estimulada por la teoría de formación de redes, y la geografía de la innovación. Este artículo evalúa el alcance con que esta renovación logra obtener una validación empírica. Basado en proyectos de investigación presentados al Sexto Programa Marco de la Unión Europea, se emplea un modelo de elección binaria para poner de relieve la existencia de efectos de red y espaciales junto con otros determinantes macroeconómicos de cooperación. Nuestros hallazgos sugieren que los efectos de red están presentes, de modo que la probabilidad de colaboración se ve influida por la posición de cada individuo dentro de la red. La distancia social parece por tanto importar más que la distancia geográfica.

Suggested Citation

  • Corinne Autant‐Bernard & Pascal Billand & David Frachisse & Nadine Massard, 2007. "Social distance versus spatial distance in R&D cooperation: Empirical evidence from European collaboration choices in micro and nanotechnologies," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 86(3), pages 495-519, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:presci:v:86:y:2007:i:3:p:495-519
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1435-5957.2007.00132.x
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    1. Marcel Fafchamps & Sanjeev Goyal & Marco J. van der Leij, 2010. "Matching and Network Effects," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(1), pages 203-231, March.
    2. Lynne G. Zucker & Michael R. Darby & Jeff Armstrong, 1994. "Intellectual Capital and the Firm: The Technology of Geographically Localized Knowledge Spillovers," NBER Working Papers 4946, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Marcel Fafchamps & Marco J. van der Leij & Tinbergen Institute and Erasmus University & Sanjeev Goyal & University of Essex, 2006. "Scientific Networks and Co-authorship," Economics Series Working Papers 256, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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