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Who instigates university–industry collaborations? University scientists versus firm employees

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Listed:
  • Rajeev K. Goel

    () (Illinois State University)

  • Devrim Göktepe-Hultén

    () (Lund University)

  • Christoph Grimpe

    () (Copenhagen Business School)

Abstract

While evidence on the causes and effects of university–industry interaction is abundant, little is known about how, and particularly by whom, such interaction is instigated in the first place and subsequently managed. In this paper, we investigate which mode of collaboration (joint research, contract research, consulting, in-licensing, or informal contacts) is more likely to be initiated and managed by firm employees versus by university scientists. Moreover, we are interested in the differences between small and large firms to see whether initiation and management are affected by firm size. Using a sample of 833 German manufacturing firms, our results indicate that university scientists typically start collaborations with industry, while firm employees would take over the management of projects. Results vary markedly between small and large firms, with university scientists having somewhat higher difficulties initiating collaborations with large firms than with small firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Rajeev K. Goel & Devrim Göktepe-Hultén & Christoph Grimpe, 2017. "Who instigates university–industry collaborations? University scientists versus firm employees," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 503-524, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:48:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11187-016-9795-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s11187-016-9795-9
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    Cited by:

    1. Azagra-Caro,Joaquín M. & González-Salmerón,Laura & Marques,Pedro, 2019. "Fiction Lagging Behind Or Non-Fiction Defending The Indefensible? University-Industry (et al.) Interaction In Science Fiction," INGENIO (CSIC-UPV) Working Paper Series 201901, INGENIO (CSIC-UPV), revised 18 Dec 2019.
    2. Steinmo, Marianne & Rasmussen, Einar, 2018. "The interplay of cognitive and relational social capital dimensions in university-industry collaboration: Overcoming the experience barrier," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(10), pages 1964-1974.
    3. Wenqing Wu & Kexin Yu & Saixiang Ma & Chien-Chi Chu & Shijie Li & Chengcheng Ma & Sang-Bing Tsai, 2018. "An Empirical Study on Optimal Strategies of Industry-University-Institute Green Innovation with Subsidy," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(5), pages 1-17, May.
    4. Roman Fudickar & Hanna Hottenrott, 2019. "Public research and the innovation performance of new technology based firms," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 326-358, April.
    5. Robert Rybnicek & Roland Königsgruber, 2019. "What makes industry–university collaboration succeed? A systematic review of the literature," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 89(2), pages 221-250, March.

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