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University and inter-firm R&D collaborations: propensity and intensity of cooperation in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • David Aristei

    (University of Perugia)

  • Michela Vecchi

    (Middlesex Business School
    NIESR)

  • Francesco Venturini

    () (University of Perugia
    NIESR)

Abstract

Abstract This paper investigates the determinants of firms’ decision to cooperate in R&D with universities and the intensity of the cooperation effort, in relation to the engagement in inter-firm R&D collaborations. Using novel survey data for seven EU countries between 2007 and 2009, our analysis accounts for unobservable factors influencing R&D cooperation forms and addresses the main endogeneity issues. We find that internal knowledge, appropriability conditions and incoming spillovers explain a large variation of the probability and of the intensity of R&D collaborations of European firms with universities (and comparably with unaffiliated companies).

Suggested Citation

  • David Aristei & Michela Vecchi & Francesco Venturini, 2016. "University and inter-firm R&D collaborations: propensity and intensity of cooperation in Europe," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 841-871, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:41:y:2016:i:4:d:10.1007_s10961-015-9403-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s10961-015-9403-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Firm R&D collaborations; University; Cooperative effort; EU;

    JEL classification:

    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models
    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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