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Discount rates and risky sexual behaviors among teenagers and young adults

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  • Harrell Chesson

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  • Jami Leichliter
  • Gregory Zimet
  • Susan Rosenthal
  • David Bernstein
  • Kenneth Fife

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between personal discount rates and sexual behaviors in a sample of teenagers and young adults. We find that higher discount rates (an indication of less willingness to forego current consumption for future consumption) are significantly associated with a range of sexual behaviors, including ever having sex, having sex before age 16 years, and past or current pregnancy. These associations are consistent with previous studies showing a link between discounting and other, non-sexual health behaviors. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2006

Suggested Citation

  • Harrell Chesson & Jami Leichliter & Gregory Zimet & Susan Rosenthal & David Bernstein & Kenneth Fife, 2006. "Discount rates and risky sexual behaviors among teenagers and young adults," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 217-230, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:32:y:2006:i:3:p:217-230
    DOI: 10.1007/s11166-006-9520-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John S.M Gustavsson, 2017. "The Marginal Cost of Transparency: Do honest nudges work?," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n289-17.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    2. Arabsheibani, Reza & Staneva, Anita, 2012. "Returns to Education in Russia: Where There Is Risky Sexual Behaviour There Is Also an Instrument," IZA Discussion Papers 6726, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Benjamin W. Cowan, 2016. "Testing for Educational Credit Constraints Using Heterogeneity in Individual Time Preferences," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(2), pages 363-402.
    4. Tatiana Kossova & Elena Kossova & Maria Sheluntcova, 2014. "Estimating the Relationship Between Rate of Time Preferences And Socio-Economic Factors In Russia," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(1), pages 39-68.
    5. Vasilios Kosteas, 2015. "Physical activity and time preference," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 361-386, December.
    6. Beraldo, Sergio & Caruso, Raul & Turati, Gilberto, 2013. "Life is now! Time preferences and crime: Aggregate evidence from the Italian regions," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 73-81.
    7. Erdal Tekin & Naci Mocan & Lan Liang, 2009. "Do Adolescents with Emotional or Behavioral Problems Respond to Cigarette Prices?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 76(1), pages 67-85, July.
    8. Barron, Kai & Gamboa, Luis F. & Rodriguez-Lesmes, Paul, 2017. "Behavioural response to a sudden health risk: Dengue and educational outcomes in Colombia," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2017-306, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    9. van der Heijden, Eline & Klein, Tobias J. & Müller, Wieland & Potters, Jan, 2012. "Framing effects and impatience: Evidence from a large scale experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 701-711.
    10. Wieland Mueller & Eline van der Heijden & Tobias J. Klein & Jan Potters, 2011. "Nudges and Impatience: Evidence from a Large Scale Experiment," Vienna Economics Papers 1110, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    11. Judith Lammers & Sweder van Wijnbergen, 2007. "HIV/AIDS, Risk Aversion and Intertemporal Choice," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-098/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 31 Jan 2008.
    12. Kirstin Appelt & David Hardisty & Elke Weber, 2011. "Asymmetric discounting of gains and losses: A query theory account," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 107-126, October.
    13. Lammers, J. & van de Kuilen, G., 2007. "The HIV Anticaptory Saving Motive : An Empirical Analysis in South Africa," Discussion Paper 2007-51, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    14. Bozzoli, Carlos G., 2016. "Orphanhood and fertility in young adults: Evidence from South Africa," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 190-200.

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