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Division of Household Labor and Marital Satisfaction in China, Japan, and Korea

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  • Takashi Oshio

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  • Kayo Nozaki
  • Miki Kobayashi

Abstract

In this study, we compared the association of marital satisfaction with the division of household labor in China, Japan, and Korea. Results revealed that wives’ marital satisfaction was negatively associated with their burden of housework in the three Asian countries, as generally observed in Western countries. However, there were noticeable cross-country differences. Chinese couples were relatively in favor of an egalitarian division of household labor. Japanese couples were supportive of traditional specialization, with wives flexibly shifting their efforts between work outside the house and housework. Korean couples were under pressure from conflicts between the wife’s labor force participation and the traditional division of labor. These findings underscored the importance of the socio-institutional context in the study of marital satisfaction. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Takashi Oshio & Kayo Nozaki & Miki Kobayashi, 2013. "Division of Household Labor and Marital Satisfaction in China, Japan, and Korea," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 211-223, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:34:y:2013:i:2:p:211-223
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-012-9321-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yan Yu, 2015. "The Male Breadwinner/Female Homemaker Model and Perceived Marital Stability: A Comparison of Chinese Wives in the United States and Urban China," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 34-47, March.
    2. Asadullah, M. Niaz & Xiao, Saizi & Yeoh, Emile, 2018. "Subjective well-being in China, 2005–2010: The role of relative income, gender, and location," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 83-101.
    3. Foster, Gigi & Stratton, Leslie S., 2017. "What Women Want (Their Men to Do): Housework and Satisfaction in Australian Households," IZA Discussion Papers 10832, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Thorsten Konietzko, 2015. "Self-Employed Individuals, Time Use, and Earnings," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 64-83, March.
    5. Yoko Mimura, 2014. "The Relationship Between Life Satisfaction Among Wives and Financial Preparedness of Households in Japan," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 532-541, December.
    6. Natalia Radchenko, 2016. "Welfare Sharing Within Households: Identification from Subjective Well-being Data and the Collective Model of Labor Supply," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 254-271, June.
    7. Beck, Matthew J. & Hess, Stephane, 2016. "Willingness to accept longer commutes for better salaries: Understanding the differences within and between couples," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 1-16.
    8. repec:spr:empeco:v:53:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00181-016-1126-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Sven Stöwhase, 2016. "Horizontal Inequities in the German Tax-Benefit-System: The Case of Two Wage-Earner Employee Households," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 313-329, June.
    10. Kirk Doran & Joseph Price, 2014. "Pornography and Marriage," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 489-498, December.
    11. Eiji Yamamura & Yoshiro Tsutsui, 2017. "Gap of height and education within couple and its effect on conflict and evaluation about partners: psychological cost of division of labor within household," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 17-35, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    12. Wei-hsin Yu & Janet Chen-Lan Kuo, 2017. "Another work-family interface: Work characteristics and family intentions in Japan," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(13), pages 391-426, January.
    13. Krista Minnotte & Michael Minnotte & Jordan Bonstrom, 2015. "Work–Family Conflicts and Marital Satisfaction Among US Workers: Does Stress Amplification Matter?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 21-33, March.

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    Keywords

    Family; Gender; Housework; Marital satisfaction;

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