IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Division of Household Labor and Marital Satisfaction in China, Japan, and Korea

Listed author(s):
  • Takashi Oshio

    ()

  • Kayo Nozaki
  • Miki Kobayashi
Registered author(s):

    In this study, we compared the association of marital satisfaction with the division of household labor in China, Japan, and Korea. Results revealed that wives’ marital satisfaction was negatively associated with their burden of housework in the three Asian countries, as generally observed in Western countries. However, there were noticeable cross-country differences. Chinese couples were relatively in favor of an egalitarian division of household labor. Japanese couples were supportive of traditional specialization, with wives flexibly shifting their efforts between work outside the house and housework. Korean couples were under pressure from conflicts between the wife’s labor force participation and the traditional division of labor. These findings underscored the importance of the socio-institutional context in the study of marital satisfaction. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-012-9321-4
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Family and Economic Issues.

    Volume (Year): 34 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 211-223

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:34:y:2013:i:2:p:211-223
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-012-9321-4
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

    Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/journal/10834/PS2

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. Anna A. Amirkhanyan & Douglas A. Wolf, 2006. "Parent Care and the Stress Process: Findings From Panel Data," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 61(5), pages 248-255.
    2. James Feyrer & Bruce Sacerdote & Ariel Dora Stern, 2008. "Will the Stork Return to Europe and Japan? Understanding Fertility within Developed Nations," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(3), pages 3-22, Summer.
    3. Hideo Akabayashi, 2006. "The labor supply of married women and spousal tax deductions in Japan—a structural estimation," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 349-378, December.
    4. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    5. Wendy Campione, 2008. "Employed Women’s Well-Being: The Global and Daily Impact of Work," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 346-361, September.
    6. Jamila Bookwala, 2009. "The Impact of Parent Care on Marital Quality and Well-Being in Adult Daughters and Sons," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 64(3), pages 339-347.
    7. Nancy Morrow-Howell & Jim Hinterlong & Philip A. Rozario & Fengyan Tang, 2003. "Effects of Volunteering on the Well-Being of Older Adults," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 58(3), pages 137-145.
    8. Yukiko Abe, 2009. "The Effects Of The 1.03 Million Yen Ceiling In A Dynamic Labor Supply Model," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(2), pages 147-163, 04.
    9. Daphne Pedersen & Krista Minnotte, 2012. "Dual Earner Husbands and Wives: Marital Satisfaction and the Workplace Culture of Each Spouse," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 272-282, September.
    10. Li, Hongbin & Zhang, Junsen & Sin, Lai Ting & Zhao, Yaohui, 2006. "Relative earnings of husbands and wives in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 412-431.
    11. Joung, Inez M. A. & van de Mheen, H. Dike & Stronks, Karien & van Poppel, Frans W. A. & Mackenbach, Johan P., 1998. "A longitudinal study of health selection in marital transitions," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 425-435, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:34:y:2013:i:2:p:211-223. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla)

    or (Rebekah McClure)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.