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Does Consumer Sentiment Foretell Revolving Credit Use?

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  • Douglas Lamdin

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Suggested Citation

  • Douglas Lamdin, 2008. "Does Consumer Sentiment Foretell Revolving Credit Use?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 279-288, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:29:y:2008:i:2:p:279-288
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-008-9099-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lucia F. Dunn & Ida A. Mirzaie, 2006. "Turns in Consumer Confidence: An Information Advantage Linked to Manufacturing," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 44(2), pages 343-351, April.
    2. Andy C. C. Kwan & John A. Cotsomitis, 2004. "Can Consumer Attitudes Forecast Household Spending in the United States? Further Evidence from the Michigan Survey of Consumers," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 71(1), pages 136-144, July.
    3. E. Philip Howrey, 2001. "The Predictive Power of the Index of Consumer Sentiment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 32(1), pages 175-216.
    4. K. H. McIntyre, 2007. "Reconciling Consumer Confidence and Permanent Income Consumption," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 257-275, Spring.
    5. WDA Bryant & JE Macri, 2001. "Does Sentiment Explain Consumption?," Research Papers 0107, Macquarie University, Department of Economics.
    6. Sarah Gelper & Aurelie Lemmens & Christophe Croux, 2007. "Consumer sentiment and consumer spending: decomposing the Granger causal relationship in the time domain," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 1-11.
    7. Thomas A. Garrett & Rubén Hernández-Murillo & Michael T. Owyang, 2005. "Does consumer sentiment predict regional consumption?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 123-135.
    8. W. Anthony Bryant & Joseph Macri, 2005. "Does sentiment explain consumption?," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 29(1), pages 97-110, March.
    9. Jeff Dominitz & Charles F. Manski, 2004. "How Should We Measure Consumer Confidence?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(2), pages 51-66, Spring.
    10. Yash P. Mehra & Elliot W. Martin, 2003. "Why does consumer sentiment predict household spending?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Fall, pages 51-67.
    11. Bacchetta, Philippe & Gerlach, Stefan, 1997. "Consumption and credit constraints: International evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 207-238, October.
    12. Gelper, S. & Lemmens, A. & Croux, C., 2007. "Consumer sentiment and consumer spending : Decomposing the granger causal relationship in the time domain," Other publications TiSEM 55ac7230-2985-41f1-a42c-7, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:soinre:v:133:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1376-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Suwen Pan & Cheng Fang & Roderick Rejesus, 2009. "Food Calorie Intake under Grain Price Uncertainty in Rural Nepal," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 137-148, June.
    3. Aneta Maria Kłopocka & Tomasz Kopczyński & Grażyna Lenicka-Bajer, 2014. "Financial Situation And Attitudes Towards Saving In Polish Society:Evidence From Micro Data," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 0, pages 476-486, May.
    4. Edward M Feasel & Nobuyuki Kanazawa, 2013. "Sentiment toward Trading Partners and International Trade," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 39(3), pages 309-327.
    5. Emrah İ. Çevik & Turhan Korkmaz & Erdal Atukeren, 2012. "Business confidence and stock returns in the USA: a time-varying Markov regime-switching model," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(4), pages 299-312, February.
    6. Olga Sorokina, 2013. "Parental Credit Constraints and Children’s College Education," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 157-171, June.
    7. Haejeong Kim & Jinhee Kim, 2010. "Information Search for Retirement Plans Among Financially Distressed Consumers," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 51-62, March.

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