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Economic growth, structural change, and search unemployment

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Abstract

Economic growth is driven by structural change. Structural change doer not come without a cost, the most evident social cost being high and persistent unemployment. This paper develops an economy with an endogenously expanding service sector, where the constant flow of workers in and out of employment relation leads to structural unemployment.
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Suggested Citation

  • Martin Zagler, 2009. "Economic growth, structural change, and search unemployment," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 96(1), pages 63-78, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jeczfn:v:96:y:2009:i:1:p:63-78
    DOI: 10.1007/s00712-008-0025-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-351, March.
    3. Piyabha Kongsamut & Sergio Rebelo & Danyang Xie, 2001. "Beyond Balanced Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(4), pages 869-882.
    4. Francesco Daveri & Guido Tabellini, 2000. "Unemployment, growth and taxation in industrial countries," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 15(30), pages 47-104, April.
    5. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 1994. "Growth and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(3), pages 477-494.
    6. Manfred Stadler & Rüdiger Wapler, 2004. "Endogenous Skilled-biased Technological Change and Matching Unemployment," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 81(1), pages 1-24, January.
    7. Palokangas, Tapio, 1996. "Endogenous growth and collective bargaining," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 925-944, May.
    8. Zagler, Martin, 2002. "Services, innovation and the new economy," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 337-355, September.
    9. Cahuc, Pierre & Michel, Philippe, 1996. "Minimum wage unemployment and growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(7), pages 1463-1482, August.
    10. Saviotti, Pier Paolo & Pyka, Andreas, 2004. "Economic development, qualitative change and employment creation," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 265-287, September.
    11. Pier Saviotti & Andreas Pyka, 2004. "Economic development by the creation of new sectors," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 1-35, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pierre-Richard Agénor & King Yoong Lim, 2017. "Unemployment, Growth and Welfare Effects of Labor Market Reforms," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 232, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    2. Florian Noseleit, 2013. "Entrepreneurship, structural change, and economic growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 735-766, September.
    3. Martin Zagler, 2006. "Does Economic Growth Exhibit A Different Impact On Job Creation And Job Destruction?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 53(5), pages 672-683, November.
    4. Teixeira, Aurora A.C. & Queirós, Anabela S.S., 2016. "Economic growth, human capital and structural change: A dynamic panel data analysis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 1636-1648.
    5. Bernadette Mukhwana Wanjala & Maureen Were, 2009. "Gender Disparities and Economic Growth in Kenya: A Social Accounting Matrix Approach," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 227-251.
    6. Anabela Queirós & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2014. "Economic growth, human capital and structural change: an empirical analysis," FEP Working Papers 549, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    IT; New economy; Sectoral shifts; Service sector; Endogenous growth; Structural unemployment; Search unemployment; J63; J64; O11; O41;

    JEL classification:

    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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