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Ordinaries

Author

Listed:
  • Terence C. Burnham

    (Chapman University)

  • Jay Phelan

    (UCLA)

Abstract

Self-control is central to human success. Neoclassical economics posits a cohesive, rational brain that always picks the best outcome. Behavioral economics documents self-control problems and suggests ‘nudges.’ Evolutionary biology explains the source of self-control struggles. Based on an evolutionary understanding, we present a comprehensive taxonomy of self-control strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Terence C. Burnham & Jay Phelan, 2020. "Ordinaries," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 137-154, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbioec:v:22:y:2020:i:3:d:10.1007_s10818-020-09303-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s10818-020-09303-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard H. Thaler & Shlomo Benartzi, 2004. "Save More Tomorrow (TM): Using Behavioral Economics to Increase Employee Saving," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(S1), pages 164-187, February.
    2. Terence C. Burnham, 2016. "Economics and evolutionary mismatch: humans in novel settings do not maximize," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 195-209, October.
    3. Zachary D. Blount & Jeffrey E. Barrick & Carla J. Davidson & Richard E. Lenski, 2012. "Genomic analysis of a key innovation in an experimental Escherichia coli population," Nature, Nature, vol. 489(7417), pages 513-518, September.
    4. Richard H. Thaler, 2018. "From Cashews to Nudges: The Evolution of Behavioral Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 108(6), pages 1265-1287, June.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 26th October 2020
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2020-10-26 12:00:03

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