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The effect of physicians’ remuneration system on the Caesarean section rate: the Uruguayan case

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  • Patricia Triunfo

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  • Máximo Rossi

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Patricia Triunfo & Máximo Rossi, 2009. "The effect of physicians’ remuneration system on the Caesarean section rate: the Uruguayan case," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 333-345, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:9:y:2009:i:4:p:333-345 DOI: 10.1007/s10754-008-9054-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christopher F Baum & Mark E. Schaffer & Steven Stillman, 2003. "Instrumental variables and GMM: Estimation and testing," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, pages 1-31.
    2. Eckerlund, Ingemar & Gerdtham, Ulf-G, 1996. "Variation in cesarean section rates in Sweden - Causes and economic consequences," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 106, Stockholm School of Economics.
    3. Epstein, Andrew J. & Nicholson, Sean, 2009. "The formation and evolution of physician treatment styles: An application to cesarean sections," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1126-1140, December.
    4. D. Fabbri & C. Monfardini & R. Radice, 2004. "Testing exogeneity in the bivariate probit model: Monte Carlo evidence and an application to health economics," Working Papers 514, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    5. Patricia M. Danzon, 1991. "Liability for Medical Malpractice," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 51-69.
    6. Danzon, Patricia M., 2000. "Liability for medical malpractice," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 26, pages 1339-1404 Elsevier.
    7. D. Fabbri & C. Monfardini, 2001. "Demand Induction with a Discrete Distribution of Patients," Working Papers 414, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alejandro Arrieta & Ariadna García-Prado, 2012. "Non-elective cesarean sections in public hospitals: hospital capacity constraints and doctor´s incentives," Documentos de Trabajo - Lan Gaiak Departamento de Economía - Universidad Pública de Navarra 1212, Departamento de Economía - Universidad Pública de Navarra.
    2. Martin Halla & Harald Mayr & Gerald J. Pruckner & Pilar Garcia-Gomez, 2016. "Cutting Fertility? The Effect of Cesarean Deliveries on Subsequent Fertility and Maternal Labor Supply," Working Papers 2016-14, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    3. Jensen, Vibeke Myrup & Wüst, Miriam, 2015. "Can Caesarean section improve child and maternal health? The case of breech babies," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 289-302.
    4. Arrieta, Alejandro, 2011. "Health reform and cesarean sections in the private sector: The experience of Peru," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 124-130, February.
    5. Wen-Yi Chen, 2013. "Do caesarean section rates ‘catch-up’? Evidence from 14 European countries," Health Care Management Science, Springer, pages 328-340.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Induced demand; Caesarian section delivery; Endogeneity; I11; I18; C35;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions

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