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Does certificate of need affect cardiac outcomes and costs?

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  • Vivian Ho

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Abstract

Several U.S. states enforce Certificate of Need (CON) regulations, which limit the number of hospitals performing open heart surgery or coronary angioplasty. CON regulations were intended to restrain cost growth and improve quality of care. This study compares mortality rates and costs for cardiac care in states with and without CON. CON appears to raise hospital procedure volume and lower the average cost of care. However, CON is associated with little reduction in inpatient mortality, and it may lead hospitals to operate on more patients than they would otherwise. The claimed welfare benefits of CON regulations require careful reconsideration. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Suggested Citation

  • Vivian Ho, 2006. "Does certificate of need affect cardiac outcomes and costs?," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 300-324, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:6:y:2006:i:4:p:300-324
    DOI: 10.1007/s10754-007-9008-9
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10754-007-9008-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ho, Vivian, 2002. "Learning and the evolution of medical technologies: the diffusion of coronary angioplasty," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 873-885, September.
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    5. Cutler, David M. & Huckman, Robert S., 2003. "Technological development and medical productivity: the diffusion of angioplasty in New York state," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 187-217, March.
    6. Lanning, Joyce A & Morrisey, Michael A & Ohsfeldt, Robert L, 1991. "Endogenous Hospital Regulation and Its Effects on Hospital and Non-hospital Expenditures," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 3(2), pages 137-154, June.
    7. Cutler, David & Huckman, Robert, 2003. "Technological Development and Medical Productivity: The Diffusion of Angioplasty in New York State," Scholarly Articles 2664291, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Averett, Susan L. & Terrizzi, Sabrina & Wang, Yang, 2017. "Taking the CON out of Pennsylvania: Did Hip and Knee Replacement Patients Benefit?," IZA Discussion Papers 10917, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Wang, Justin & Hockenberry, Jason & Chou, Shin-Yi & Yang, Muzhe, 2011. "Do bad report cards have consequences? Impacts of publicly reported provider quality information on the CABG market in Pennsylvania," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 392-407, March.
    3. David M. Cutler & Robert S. Huckman & Jonathan T. Kolstad, 2010. "Input Constraints and the Efficiency of Entry: Lessons from Cardiac Surgery," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 51-76, February.
    4. Suhui Li & Avi Dor, 2013. "How Do Hospitals Respond to Market Entry? Evidence from A Deregulated Market for Cardiac Revascularization," NBER Working Papers 18926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Guy David & Lorens A. Helmchen & Robert A. Henderson, 2009. "Does advanced medical technology encourage hospitalist use and their direct employment by hospitals?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 237-247.
    6. Kolstad, Jonathan T. & Cutler, David M. & Huckman, Robert Steven, 2010. "Input Constraints and the Efficiency of Entry: Lessons from Cardiac Surgery," Scholarly Articles 5344226, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    7. Polsky, Daniel & David, Guy & Yang, Jianing & Kinosian, Bruce & Werner, Rachel M., 2014. "The effect of entry regulation in the health care sector: The case of home health," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 1-14.

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