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Evaluating the Effect of Ownership Status on Hospital Quality: The Key Role of Innovative Procedures

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  • Laurent Gobillon
  • Carine Milcent

Abstract

Mortality differences between university, non-teaching public and for-profit hospitals are investigated using an exhaustive French administrative dataset of patients admitted for heart attacks. Our results show that innovative procedures play a key role in explaining the effect of ownership status on hospital quality. When age, sex, diagnoses and co-morbidities are held constant, the mortality rates in for-profit and university hospitals are similar, but they are lower than in nonteaching public hospitals. When additionally controlling for innovative procedures, the mortality rate is higher in for-profit hospitals than in the two groups of public hospitals. This suggests that the quality of care in for-profit hospitals relies on their capacity to perform innovative procedures. A counterfactual exercise shows that if patients in non-teaching public hospitals were treated with innovative procedures following the assignment rule of for-profit hospitals rather than that of non-teaching public hospitals, their probability of death after a duration of 7 days would be 1.8 points lower,

Suggested Citation

  • Laurent Gobillon & Carine Milcent, 2016. "Evaluating the Effect of Ownership Status on Hospital Quality: The Key Role of Innovative Procedures," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 121-122, pages 161-186.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:2016:i:121-122:p:161-186
    DOI: 10.15609/annaeconstat2009.121-122.161
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    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.15609/annaeconstat2009.121-122.161
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laurent Gobillon & Thierry Magnac & Harris Selod, 2011. "The effect of location on finding a job in the Paris region," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(7), pages 1079-1112, November.
    2. Ridder, Geert & Tunali, Insan, 1999. "Stratified partial likelihood estimation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 92(2), pages 193-232, October.
    3. Jonathan Skinner & Douglas Staiger, 2015. "Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth in Health Care," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(5), pages 951-964, December.
    4. David M. Cutler & Mark McClellan, 1996. "The Determinants of Technological Change in Heart Attack Treatment," NBER Working Papers 5751, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Cutler, David M. & Huckman, Robert S., 2003. "Technological development and medical productivity: the diffusion of angioplasty in New York state," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 187-217, March.
    6. Mark McClellan & Douglas Staiger, 1999. "The Quality of Health Care Providers," NBER Working Papers 7327, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Daniel Kessler & Mark McClellan, 2001. "The Effects of Hospital Ownership on Medical Productivity," NBER Working Papers 8537, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Mark G. Duggan, 2000. "Hospital Ownership and Public Medical Spending," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1343-1373.
    9. Cutler, David & Huckman, Robert, 2003. "Technological Development and Medical Productivity: The Diffusion of Angioplasty in New York State," Scholarly Articles 2664291, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    10. Ho, Vivian, 2002. "Learning and the evolution of medical technologies: the diffusion of coronary angioplasty," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 873-885, September.
    11. Lien, Hsien-Ming & Chou, Shin-Yi & Liu, Jin-Tan, 2008. "Hospital ownership and performance: Evidence from stroke and cardiac treatment in Taiwan," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1208-1223, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gobillon, Laurent & Milcent, Carine, 2017. "Competition and hospital quality: Evidence from a French natural experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 11773, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Hospital Performance; Innovative Procedures; Stratified Duration Model.;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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