IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/7324.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Comparing Hospital Quality at For-Profit and Not-for-Profit Hospitals

Author

Listed:
  • Mark McClellan
  • Douglas Staiger

Abstract

Do not-for-profit hospitals provide better care than for-profit hospitals? We compare patient outcomes in for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals between 1984 and 1994 using a new method for estimating differences across hospitals that yields far more accurate estimates of hospital quality than previously available. We find that, on average, for-profit hospitals have higher mortality among elderly patients with heart disease, and that this difference has grown over the last decade. However, much of the difference appears to be associated with the location of for-profit hospitals. Within specific markets, for-profit ownership appears if anything to be associated with better quality care. Moreover, the small average difference in mortality between for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals masks an enormous amount of variation in mortality within each of these ownership types. Overall, these results suggest that factors other than for-profit status per se may be the main determinants of quality of care in hospitals.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark McClellan & Douglas Staiger, 1999. "Comparing Hospital Quality at For-Profit and Not-for-Profit Hospitals," NBER Working Papers 7324, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7324
    Note: AG HC
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w7324.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Edward C. Norton & Douglas O. Staiger, 1994. "How Hospital Ownership Affects Access to Care for the Uninsured," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 25(1), pages 171-185, Spring.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Karen Eggleston & Yu-Chu Shen & Joseph Lau & Christopher H. Schmid & Jia Chan, 2008. "Hospital ownership and quality of care: what explains the different results in the literature?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(12), pages 1345-1362.
    2. Lang, Kevin & Weinstein, Russell, 2013. "The wage effects of not-for-profit and for-profit certifications: Better data, somewhat different results," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 230-243.
    3. Carine Milcent, 2005. "Hospital ownership, reimbursement systems and mortality rates," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(11), pages 1151-1168.
    4. Baltagi, Badi H. & Yen, Yin-Fang, 2014. "Hospital treatment rates and spillover effects: Does ownership matter?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 193-202.
    5. Dalton, Christina Marsh & Warren, Patrick L., 2016. "Cost versus control: Understanding ownership through outsourcing in hospitals," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 1-15.
    6. Paul H. Jensen & Elizabeth Webster & Julia Witt, 2009. "Hospital type and patient outcomes: an empirical examination using AMI readmission and mortality records," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(12), pages 1440-1460.
    7. Yu-Chu Shen & Karen Eggleston & Joseph Lau & Christopher Schmid, 2005. "Hospital Ownership and Financial Performance: A Quantitative Research Review," NBER Working Papers 11662, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Kathleen A. Carroll & Jane E. Ruseski, 2011. "Modeling Internal Decision Making Process: An Explanation Of Conflicting Empirical Results On Behavior Of Non‐Profit And For‐Profit Hospitals," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(4), pages 510-523, October.
    9. Mark Duggan, 2000. "Hospital Market Structure and the Behavior of Not-for-Profit Hospitals: Evidence from Responses to California's Disproportionate Share Program," NBER Working Papers 7966, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. John Geweke & Gautam Gowrisankaran & Robert J. Town, 2003. "Bayesian Inference for Hospital Quality in a Selection Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(4), pages 1215-1238, July.
    11. Avi Dor & Siran M. Koroukian & Michael Grossman, 2004. "Managed Care Discounting: Evidence from the MarketScan Database," NBER Working Papers 10437, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Mehdi Farsi & Geert Ridder, 2006. "Estimating the out-of-hospital mortality rate using patient discharge data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(9), pages 983-995.
    13. Barbara A. Mark & David W. Harless & Michael McCue, 2005. "The impact of HMO penetration on the relationship between nurse staffing and quality," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(7), pages 737-753.
    14. Marco Castaneda & Dino Falaschetti, 2008. "Does a Hospital’s Profit Status Affect its Operational Scope?," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 33(2), pages 129-159, September.
    15. Pierre Koning & Joëlle Noailly & Sabine Visser, 2007. "Do non-profits make a difference? Evaluating non-profit vis-à-vis for-profit organisations in social services," CPB Document 142, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    16. Gillian Currie & Cam Donaldson & Mingshan Lu, 2003. "What Does Canada Profit from the For-Profit Debate on Health Care?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 29(2), pages 227-251, June.
    17. Gautam Gowrisankaran & Robert J. Town, 2000. "Inferring Hospital Quality from Patient Discharge Records Using a Bayesian Selection Model," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1773, Econometric Society.
    18. Yu-Chu Shen & Karen Eggleston, 2009. "The effect of soft budget constraints on access and quality in hospital care," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 211-232, June.
    19. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:58:y:2017:i:c:p:43-54 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Pierre Koning & Joëlle Noailly & Sabine Visser, 2007. "Do Not-For-Profits Make a Difference in Social Services? A Survey Study," De Economist, Springer, vol. 155(3), pages 251-270, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7324. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.