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Are social preferences related to market performance?

  • Andreas Leibbrandt

    ()

This paper combines laboratory with field data from professional sellers to study whether social preferences are related to performance in open-air markets. The data show that sellers who are more pro-social in a laboratory experiment are also more successful in natural markets: They achieve higher prices for similar quality, have superior trade relations and better abilities to signal trustworthiness to buyers. These findings suggest that social preferences play a significant role for outcomes in natural markets. Copyright Economic Science Association 2012

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10683-012-9315-y
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Experimental Economics.

Volume (Year): 15 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 589-603

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Handle: RePEc:kap:expeco:v:15:y:2012:i:4:p:589-603
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