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Climate Policy without Tears CGE-Based Ancillary Benefits Estimates for Chile

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  • Sébastien Dessus
  • David O'Connor

Abstract

This study examines a hithertoneglected set of benefits from climate policy,viz., the reduction in emissions of localair pollutants and the associated healthbenefits, in this case for residents ofSantiago de Chile. By using an economy-widemodel, we are able to compare these monetisedbenefits to the direct costs of carbonabatement, thereby determining the scope for “no regrets” CO 2 reductions. Sensitivityanalysis is performed in recognition of theuncertainty surrounding certain key parameterand exogenous variable values – notably,households' willingness to pay (WTP) forreduced mortality and morbidity risk, and thesubstitution elasticities among energy sourcesand between energy and other inputs. Ourresults suggest that, even with the mostconservative assumptions (low WTP, lowelasticities), Chile could reduce CO 2 emissions by almost 20% from the 2010 baselinewith no net welfare loss, though a 10%reduction is closer to “optimal”. If insteadChile were to target a 20% reduction inparticulate concentrations, a particulate taxwould incur slightly lower costs than anequivalent carbon tax to achieve the samehealth benefits. While the latter is asecond-best method of addressing localpollution, the welfare loss of choosing thisinstrument could be fully compensated by carboncredit sales at a world market price of$20/tC. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Sébastien Dessus & David O'Connor, 2003. "Climate Policy without Tears CGE-Based Ancillary Benefits Estimates for Chile," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 25(3), pages 287-317, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:25:y:2003:i:3:p:287-317
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1024469430532
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Beghin, John C. & Dessus, Sebastien, 1999. "Double Dividend With Trade Distortions: Analytical Results And Evidence From Chile," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21509, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Boyd Roy & Krutilla Kerry & Viscusi W. Kip, 1995. "Energy Taxation as a Policy Instrument to Reduce CO2 Emissions: A Net Benefit Analysis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 1-24, July.
    3. O'Ryan, Raul E., 1996. "Cost-Effective Policies to Improve Urban Air Quality in Santiago, Chile," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 302-313, November.
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    5. Robert Ayres & Jörg Walter, 1991. "The greenhouse effect: Damages, costs and abatement," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 1(3), pages 237-270, September.
    6. Richard T. Carson, 2011. "Contingent Valuation," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2489, February.
    7. Ekins, Paul, 1996. "How large a carbon tax is justified by the secondary benefits of CO2 abatement?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 161-187, June.
    8. Alberini, Anna & Cropper, Maureen & Fu, Tsu-Tan & Krupnick, Alan & Liu, Jin-Tan & Shaw, Daigee & Harrington, Winston, 1997. "Valuing Health Effects of Air Pollution in Developing Countries: The Case of Taiwan," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 107-126, October.
    9. John Beghin & Sébastien Dessus & David Roland-Holst & Dominique van der Mensbrugghe, 1996. "General Equilibrium Modelling of Trade and the Environment," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 116, OECD Publishing.
    10. William H. Desvousges & F. R. Johnson & H. S. Banzhaf, 1998. "environmental policy analysis with limited information," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1328, February.
    11. Liu, Jin-Tan & Hammitt, James K. & Liu, Jin-Long, 1997. "Estimated hedonic wage function and value of life in a developing country," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 353-358, December.
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