IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Double Dividend with Trade Distortions: Analytical Results and Evidence from Chile

The double-dividend debate evolves around the possibility (or not) of substituting environmental taxes for more distortionary taxes to reduce both pollution degradation or damages (the first dividend) and the excess burden of existing taxes (the second dividend). This debate tends to center on labor market distortions, but this paper shifts the focus to trade and environmental distortions. Specifically, Beghin and Dessus empirically explore the trade/environment double-dividend with an applied general equilibrium model of the Chilean economy. Findings suggest that swapping environmental taxes for trade distortions in Chile does indeed improve welfare. Furthermore, the swap would pay for itself under the assumption of separable pollution damages from market-good consumption.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
File Function: Full Text
Download Restriction: no

File URL:
File Function: Online Synopsis
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University in its series Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications with number 99-wp225.

in new window

Date of creation: Sep 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ias:cpaper:99-wp225
Contact details of provider: Postal: 578 Heady Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011-1070
Phone: (515) 294-1183
Fax: (515) 294-6336
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Copeland Brian R., 1994. "International Trade and the Environment: Policy Reform in a Polluted Small Open Economy," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 44-65, January.
  2. John Beghin & David Roland-Holst & Dominique van der Mensbrugghe, 1997. "Trade and Pollution Linkages: Piecemeal Reform and Optimal Intervention," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(2), pages 442-55, May.
  3. Bovenberg, A.L. & Goulder, L.H., 1996. "Optimal environmental taxation in the presence of other taxes : General equilibrium analyses," Other publications TiSEM 5d4b7517-c5c8-4ef6-ab76-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  4. Terkla, David, 1984. "The efficiency value of effluent tax revenues," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 107-123, June.
  5. Lawrence Goulder, 1995. "Environmental taxation and the double dividend: A reader's guide," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 157-183, August.
  6. Beghin, John C. & Roland-Holst, David & Van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique, 1995. "Trade Liberalization and the Environment in the Pacific Basin: Coordinated Approaches to Mexican Trade and Environment Policy," Staff General Research Papers 1588, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  7. Rod Falvey, 1994. "Revenue enhancing tariff reform," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 130(1), pages 175-190, March.
  8. Ng, Yew-Kwang, 1980. "Optimal Corrective Taxes or Subsidies When Revenue Raising Imposes an Excess Burden," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 744-51, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ias:cpaper:99-wp225. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.