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Are Minimum Wages to Blame for Informality in the Labour Market?


  • Francisco Carneiro


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Suggested Citation

  • Francisco Carneiro, 2004. "Are Minimum Wages to Blame for Informality in the Labour Market?," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 31(4), pages 295-306, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:empiri:v:31:y:2004:i:4:p:295-306 DOI: 10.1007/s10663-004-2639-x

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bell, David N F & Wright, Robert E, 1996. "The Impact of Minimum Wages on the Wages of the Low Paid: Evidence from the Wage Boards and Councils," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(436), pages 650-656, May.
    2. Miguel N. Foguel & Lauro Ramos & Francisco Carneiro, 2015. "the Impacts of the Minimum Wage on the Labor Market, Poverty and Fiscal Budget in Brazil," Discussion Papers 0108, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    3. Burkhauser, Richard V & Couch, Kenneth A & Wittenburg, David C, 2000. "A Reassessment of the New Economics of the Minimum Wage Literature with Monthly Data from the Current Population Survey," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(4), pages 653-680, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Davidescu, Adriana Anamaria & Schneider, Friedrich, 2017. "Nature of the Relationship between Minimum Wage and the Shadow Economy Size: An Empirical Analysis for the Case of Romania," IZA Discussion Papers 11247, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Alexander Muravyev & Aleksey Oshchepkov, 2013. "Minimum wages and labor market outcomes: evidence from the emerging economy of Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 29/EC/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    3. Muravyev, Alexander & Oshchepkov, Aleksey, 2013. "Minimum Wages, Unemployment and Informality: Evidence from Panel Data on Russian Regions," IZA Discussion Papers 7878, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Calavrezo, Oana & Pelek, Selin, 2011. "Qui sont les salariés payés au niveau du salaire minimum? Une analyse empirique à partir de données turques," GIAM Working Papers 11-2, Galatasaray University Economic Research Center, revised 13 Feb 2011.
    5. Fairris, David & Jonasson, Erik, 2016. "Determinants of Changing Informal Employment in Brazil, 2000–2010," MPRA Paper 71475, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    Minimum wages; employment; cointegration analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J51 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effects
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models


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