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Keynesian Dynamics and the Wage–Price Spiral: Identifying Downward Rigidities

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  • Pu Chen

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  • Peter Flaschel

Abstract

We develop a constrained bivariate switching model to explore empirically the behavior of wage and price Phillips-curves for high- and low-inflation regimes. Using this switching regression technique with a structural simultaneous equations model of Phillips curves, we identify significant lower floors for wage and price inflation. We interpret these lower floors as the relevant downward rigidity for wages and prices. Such floors imply that the adverse real-wage adjustment mechanism that can be identified in the high-inflation regime may disappear in the low-inflation regime, where money-wage inflation and price inflation, and thus real-wage movements, may become rigid. Consequently, the economy may be stabilized then, but trapped in a long period of stagnation in such a low-inflation situation. Such properties of kinked wage and price Phillips-curves are thus important and could also be of help to break another important destabilizing feedback channel, the Fisher debt deflation mechanism, according to which economies, in which highly indebted firms are unable to prevent price deflation, will experience severe crisis or even economic breakdown if the resulting deflationary spiral cannot be stopped. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

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  • Pu Chen & Peter Flaschel, 2005. "Keynesian Dynamics and the Wage–Price Spiral: Identifying Downward Rigidities," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 115-142, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:compec:v:25:y:2005:i:1:p:115-142
    DOI: 10.1007/s10614-005-6278-5
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    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Pu & Hsiao, Chih-Ying, 2008. "What happens to Japan if China catches a cold?: A causal analysis of Chinese growth and Japanese growth," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 622-638, December.
    2. Gregor W. Smith, 2006. "The spectre of deflation: a review of empirical evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1041-1072, November.
    3. Peter Flaschel & Göran Kauermann & Willi Semmler, 2007. "Testing Wage And Price Phillips Curves For The United States," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 550-581, November.
    4. Pu Chen & Carl Chiarella & Peter Flaschel & Hing Hung, 2006. "Keynesian Disequilibrium Dynamics: Convergence, Roads to Instability and the Emergence of Complex Business Fluctuations," Working Paper Series 146, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    5. Carl Chiarella & Hing Hung & Peter Flaschel, 2010. "Keynesian Macrodynamics: Convergence, Roads to Instability and the Emergence of Complex Business Fluctuations," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 4(3), pages 236-262, November.
    6. Alfonso Arpaia & Karl Pichelmann, 2007. "Nominal and real wage flexibility in EMU," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 299-328, November.
    7. Chen Pu & Hsiao Chihying, 2005. "What Happens to Japan if China Catches Cold? - A causal analysis of the Chinese growth and the Japanese growth," Econometrics 0510005, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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