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Do schooling reforms improve long-term health?

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  • David Madden

    (University College Dublin, Ireland)

Abstract

A statistical association between more education and better health outcomes has long been observed, but in the absence of experimental data researchers have struggled to find a causal effect. Schooling reforms such as raising school leaving age, which have been enacted in many countries, can be viewed as a form of natural experiment and provide a possible method of identifying such an effect. However, the balance of evidence so far is that these reforms have had little impact on long-term health. Thus, policymakers should be cautious before anticipating a health effect when introducing reforms of this nature.

Suggested Citation

  • David Madden, 2016. "Do schooling reforms improve long-term health?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 306-306, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izawol:journl:y:2016:n:306
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Ma, Yuanyuan & Nolan, Anne & Smith, James P., 2018. "The value of education to health: Evidence from Ireland," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 14-25.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    schooling reform; long-term health; local treatment effect;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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