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Priority Shifting and the Dynamics of Managing Eradicable Infectious Diseases

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  • Radboud J. Duintjer Tebbens

    () (Kids Risk Project, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115; and Delft Institute of Applied Mathematics, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CD Delft, The Netherlands)

  • Kimberly M. Thompson

    () (Kid Risk, Inc., Newton, Massachusetts 02459; and Kids Risk Project, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115)

Abstract

Public health budget constraints force policy makers to prioritize resources toward those interventions that yield the highest perceived benefits. Intuitively, it appears optimal to focus resources on affordable interventions against prevalent diseases. However, due to the dynamics of infectious disease eradication, policies focusing on a static perception of priorities may lead to economically suboptimal outcomes. Using a hypothetical two-disease dynamic transmission model, we explore several different decision rules with respect to vaccination policy for eradicable diseases. The simulations show that cost-effectiveness decreases as the extent of priority shifting increases. This model suggests the need for a longer-term dynamic perspective to appropriately recognize costs and benefits of different policies for eradicable diseases.

Suggested Citation

  • Radboud J. Duintjer Tebbens & Kimberly M. Thompson, 2009. "Priority Shifting and the Dynamics of Managing Eradicable Infectious Diseases," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 55(4), pages 650-663, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:55:y:2009:i:4:p:650-663
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.1080.0965
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Duijzer, L.E. & van Jaarsveld, W.L. & Dekker, R., 2017. "Literature Review - the vaccine supply chain," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI2017-01, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    2. repec:eee:ejores:v:268:y:2018:i:1:p:174-192 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:ejores:v:265:y:2018:i:3:p:1046-1063 is not listed on IDEAS

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