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Trading as Entertainment?

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel Dorn

    () (LeBow College of Business, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104)

  • Paul Sengmueller

    () (CentER, Tilburg University, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands)

Abstract

Among 1,000 German brokerage clients for whom both survey responses and actual trading records are available, investors who report enjoying investing or gambling turn over their portfolio at twice the rate of their peers. Including entertainment attributes as additional explanatory variables in cross-sectional regressions of portfolio turnover on objective investor attributes more than doubles the fraction of the total variation of portfolio turnover that can be explained. The results are robust to controlling for gender and proxies for overconfidence constructed from survey responses. Nonpecuniary benefits of trading thus appear to offer a straightforward explanation of the "excessive trading puzzle."

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Dorn & Paul Sengmueller, 2009. "Trading as Entertainment?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 55(4), pages 591-603, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:55:y:2009:i:4:p:591-603
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.1080.0962
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Abreu, Margarida & Mendes, Victor, 2012. "Information, overconfidence and trading: Do the sources of information matter?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 868-881.
    2. Markus Glaser & Martin Weber, 2007. "Overconfidence and trading volume," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance Theory, Springer;International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics (The Geneva Association), vol. 32(1), pages 1-36, June.
    3. Matthew Hood & John Nofsinger & Abhishek Varma, 2014. "Conservation, Discrimination, and Salvation: Investors’ Social Concerns in the Stock Market," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 45(1), pages 5-37, February.
    4. Brown, Jeffrey R. & Farrell, Anne M. & Weisbenner, Scott J., 2016. "Decision-making approaches and the propensity to default: Evidence and implications," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 477-495.
    5. repec:bla:acctfi:v:57:y:2017:i:3:p:759-788 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Robin Chark & Soo Chew, 2015. "A neuroimaging study of preference for strategic uncertainty," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 209-227, June.
    7. Bauer, Rob & Cosemans, Mathijs & Eichholtz, Piet, 2009. "Option trading and individual investor performance," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 731-746, April.
    8. Philippe Bernard & Michel Blanchard, 2013. "The performance of amateur traders on a public internet site: a case of a stock-exchange contest," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1729-1737.
    9. Galit Klein & Ze’ev Shtudiner, 2016. "Trust in others: does it affect investment decisions?," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(5), pages 1949-1967, September.
    10. Stephan Meyer & Sebastian Schroff & Christof Weinhardt, 2014. "(Un)skilled leveraged trading of retail investors," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer;Swiss Society for Financial Market Research, vol. 28(2), pages 111-138, May.
    11. Hoffmann, Arvid O.I. & Post, Thomas & Pennings, Joost M.E., 2013. "Individual investor perceptions and behavior during the financial crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 60-74.
    12. Hayley, Simon & Marsh, Ian W., 2016. "What do retail FX traders learn?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 16-38.
    13. Meyer, Steffen & Urban, Linda & Ahlswede, Sophie, 2015. "Does a personalized feedback on investment success mitigate investment mistakes of private investors? Answers from large natural field experiment," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112988, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    14. Daniel Ladley & Guanqing Liu & James Rockey, 2016. "Margin Trading: Hedonic Returns and Real Losses," Discussion Papers in Economics 16/06, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    15. Magron, Camille & Merli, Maxime, 2015. "Repurchase behavior of individual investors, sophistication and regret," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 15-26.
    16. Merkle, Christoph & Egan, Daniel P. & Davies, Greg B., 2015. "Investor happiness," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 167-186.
    17. Kleine, Jens & Wagner, Niklas & Weller, Tim, 2016. "Openness endangers your wealth: Noise trading and the big five," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 239-247.
    18. Merkle, Christoph & Weber, Martin, 2014. "Do investors put their money where their mouth is? Stock market expectations and investing behavior," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 372-386.
    19. Hoffmann, Arvid O.I. & Shefrin, Hersh, 2014. "Technical analysis and individual investors," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 107(PB), pages 487-511.
    20. Carlos Cueva Herrero & Iñigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe Kortajarene & Giovanni Ponti & Josefa Tomás Lucas, 2017. "Boys will (still) be boys: Gender differences in trading activity are not due to differences in confidence," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-06, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    21. Kumar, Alok & Page, Jeremy K. & Spalt, Oliver G., 2011. "Religious beliefs, gambling attitudes, and financial market outcomes," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 671-708.
    22. Puustinen, Pekka & Maas, Peter & Karjaluoto, Heikki, 2013. "Development and validation of the Perceived Investment Value (PIV) scale," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 41-54.
    23. Dorn, Daniel, 2010. "Investors with too many options?," Working Paper Series 1197, European Central Bank.
    24. repec:eee:jbfina:v:84:y:2017:i:c:p:68-87 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. Barber, Brad M. & Odean, Terrance, 2013. "The Behavior of Individual Investors," Handbook of the Economics of Finance, Elsevier.

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    Keywords

    investor decision making; trading volume;

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