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Identifying Unmet Demand

Listed author(s):
  • Sandeep R. Chandukala

    ()

    (Kelley School of Business, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405)

  • Yancy D. Edwards

    ()

    (School of Business, Saint Leo University, Saint Leo, Florida 33574)

  • Greg M. Allenby

    ()

    (Fisher College of Business, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210)

Registered author(s):

    Brand preferences and marketplace demand are a reflection of the importance of underlying needs of consumers and the efficacy of product attributes for delivering value. Dog owners, for example, may look to dog foods to provide specific benefits for their pets (e.g., shiny coats) that may not be available from current offerings. An analysis of consumer wants for these consumers would reveal weak demand for product attributes resulting from low efficacy, despite the presence of strong latent interest. The challenge in identifying such unmet demand is in distinguishing it from other reasons for weak preference, such as general noninterest in the category and heterogeneous tastes. We propose a model for separating out these effects within the context of conjoint analysis, and we demonstrate its value with data from a national survey of toothpaste preferences. Implications for product development and reformulation are explored.

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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mksc.1100.0589
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    Article provided by INFORMS in its journal Marketing Science.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1 (01-02)
    Pages: 61-73

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    Handle: RePEc:inm:ormksc:v:30:y:2011:i:1:p:61-73
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    1. Paul E. Green & Abba M. Krieger, 1995. "Attribute Importance Weights Modification in Assessing a Brand's Competitive Potential," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 14(3), pages 253-270.
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    8. Sha Yang & Gerg M. Allenby & Geraldine Fennel, 2002. "Modeling Variation in Brand Preference: The Roles of Objective Environment and Motivating Conditions," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 21(1), pages 14-31, May.
    9. Dan Horsky & Sanjog Misra & Paul Nelson, 2006. "Observed and Unobserved Preference Heterogeneity in Brand-Choice Models," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 25(4), pages 322-335, 07-08.
    10. Kirthi Kalyanam & Sharad Borle & Peter Boatwright, 2007. "Deconstructing Each Item's Category Contribution," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 26(3), pages 327-341, 05-06.
    11. Peter J. Lenk & Wayne S. DeSarbo & Paul E. Green & Martin R. Young, 1996. "Hierarchical Bayes Conjoint Analysis: Recovery of Partworth Heterogeneity from Reduced Experimental Designs," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 15(2), pages 173-191.
    12. Bettman, James R & Park, C Whan, 1980. " Effects of Prior Knowledge and Experience and Phase of the Choice Process on Consumer Decision Processes: A Protocol Analysis," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(3), pages 234-248, December.
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