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Impact of Economic, Social and Environmental Variables on Competitiveness of Automotive Industry: Evidence from Panel Data

Author

Listed:
  • Abdul Hannan

    (Atlas Honda Limited, 26-27Km. LHR-SKP Road, Sheikhupura, Pakistan)

  • Faheem Haider

    (Atlas Honda Limited, 26-27Km. LHR-SKP Road, Sheikhupura, Pakistan)

  • Nisar Ahmad

    (Hailey College of Commerce, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan)

  • Tahira Ishaq

    (Staff Economist, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad, Pakistan)

Abstract

The study examines the impact of economic, social and environmental factors on the competitiveness of automotive industry. Competitiveness of industry is measured by the Revealed Comparative Advantage (RCA) Index and fixed effect model is estimated by using the data of 14 Asian countries for the period ranging from 1991 to 2012. Results showed that competitiveness of automotive industry is positively related to economic performance, human capital development, urbanization and tariff rate while negatively affected by lending rate and carbon emission. Findings of the study suggest that external factors should be given due consideration particularly lending rate, human capital development and tariff to improve the competitiveness of automotive industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdul Hannan & Faheem Haider & Nisar Ahmad & Tahira Ishaq, 2015. "Impact of Economic, Social and Environmental Variables on Competitiveness of Automotive Industry: Evidence from Panel Data," Bulletin of Energy Economics (BEE), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 3(4), pages 194-202, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijr:beejor:v:3:y:2015:i:4:p:194-202
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    2. Orazio P. Attanasio & Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Ekaterini Kyriazidou, 2008. "Credit Constraints In The Market For Consumer Durables: Evidence From Micro Data On Car Loans," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 49(2), pages 401-436, May.
    3. Adam B. Jaffe & Karen Palmer, 1997. "Environmental Regulation And Innovation: A Panel Data Study," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 610-619, November.
    4. Smith Jr. , Donald F. & Florida Richard, 1994. "Agglomeration and Industrial Location: An Econometric Analysis of Japanese-Affiliated Manufacturing Establishments in Automotive-Related Industries," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 23-41, July.
    5. Jan Fagerberg, 2002. "Technology, Growth and Competitiveness," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2577.
    6. Selahattin Bekmez & Murat Komut, 2006. "Competitiveness of Turkish Automotive Industry: A Comparison with European Union Countries," Papers of the Annual IUE-SUNY Cortland Conference in Economics, in: Oguz Esen & Ayla Ogus (ed.), Proceedings of the Conference on Human and Economic Resources, pages 183-192, Izmir University of Economics.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Competitiveness; Automotive Industry; Economic Growth; Human capital Tariff;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • L52 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Industrial Policy; Sectoral Planning Methods

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    Access and download statistics

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