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Structural Change and Technology. A Long View

  • Bart Verspagen

Neo-Schumpeterians of the 1970s and 1980s argued for the concept of pervasive technological systems as one way of interpreting creative destruction. Pervasive technologies are basic innovations that find application in a wide variety of sectors in the economy. It has recently been suggested that the period of rapid economic growth in the 1990s in the United States can be explained by the rise of a set of technologies known as Information and Communication Technologies (ict). Such an interpretation is certainly in broad accordance with the notions of Schumpeterian radical technological breakthroughs, creative destruction and pervasive technological systems. This paper provides an attempt to interpret this ict ??revolution?? from a Schumpeterian point of view, using input-output data and technology flow matrices for the us economy. The paper concludes with a broad discussion of the historic role of ict in the us and world economy.

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Article provided by Presses de Sciences-Po in its journal Revue économique.

Volume (Year): 55 (2004)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 1099-1125

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Handle: RePEc:cai:recosp:reco_556_1099
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  1. Samuel Kortum & Jonathan Putnam, 1997. "Assigning Patents to Industries: Tests of the Yale Technology Concordance," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 161-176.
  2. Kleinknecht, Alfred, 1990. "Are There Schumpeterian Waves of Innovations?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(1), pages 81-92, March.
  3. Jaffe, A.B. & Trajtenberg, M., 1992. "Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations," Papers 14-92, Tel Aviv.
  4. Bart Verspagen, 1997. "Measuring Intersectoral Technology Spillovers: Estimates from the European and US Patent Office Databases," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(1), pages 47-65.
  5. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters, in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 17-45 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Keith Smith, . "Assessing the economic impacts of ICT," STEP Report series 200201, The STEP Group, Studies in technology, innovation and economic policy.
  7. Gordon, Robert J, 2000. "Does the 'New Economy' Measure up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2607, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. David, Paul A, 1990. "The Dynamo and the Computer: An Historical Perspective on the Modern Productivity Paradox," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 355-61, May.
  9. Nelson, Richard R & Wright, Gavin, 1992. "The Rise and Fall of American Technological Leadership: The Postwar Era in Historical Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 1931-64, December.
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