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Structural Change and Technology. A Long View

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  • Bart Verspagen

Abstract

Neo-Schumpeterians of the 1970s and 1980s argued for the concept of pervasive technological systems as one way of interpreting creative destruction. Pervasive technologies are basic innovations that find application in a wide variety of sectors in the economy. It has recently been suggested that the period of rapid economic growth in the 1990s in the United States can be explained by the rise of a set of technologies known as Information and Communication Technologies (ict). Such an interpretation is certainly in broad accordance with the notions of Schumpeterian radical technological breakthroughs, creative destruction and pervasive technological systems. This paper provides an attempt to interpret this ict “revolution” from a Schumpeterian point of view, using input-output data and technology flow matrices for the us economy. The paper concludes with a broad discussion of the historic role of ict in the us and world economy.

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  • Bart Verspagen, 2004. "Structural Change and Technology. A Long View," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 55(6), pages 1099-1125.
  • Handle: RePEc:cai:recosp:reco_556_1099
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David, Paul A, 1990. "The Dynamo and the Computer: An Historical Perspective on the Modern Productivity Paradox," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 355-361, May.
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    4. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 17-45 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Keith Smith, "undated". "Assessing the economic impacts of ICT," STEP Report series 200201, The STEP Group, Studies in technology, innovation and economic policy.
    6. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 49-74, Fall.
    7. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg & Rebecca Henderson, 1993. "Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 577-598.
    8. Samuel Kortum & Jonathan Putnam, 1997. "Assigning Patents to Industries: Tests of the Yale Technology Concordance," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 161-176.
    9. Nelson, Richard R & Wright, Gavin, 1992. "The Rise and Fall of American Technological Leadership: The Postwar Era in Historical Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 1931-1964, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. André Lorentz & Maria Savona, 2008. "Evolutionary micro-dynamics and changes in the economic structure," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 389-412, August.
    2. Charlie Karlsson & Gunther Maier & Michaela Trippl & Iulia Siedschlag & Gavin Murphy, 2010. "ICT and Regional Economic Dynamics: A Literature Review," JRC Working Papers JRC59920, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    3. BEN KHALIFA, Adel, 2017. "Territoire Appropriant Et Economie De La Connaissance Basee Sur Les Tic : Une Approche Eclectique
      [Appropriating Territory and ICT-Based Knowledge economy: An Eclectic Approach]
      ," MPRA Paper 77535, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Abdul Hannan & Faheem Haider & Nisar Ahmad & Tahira Ishaq, 2015. "Impact of Economic, Social and Environmental Variables on Competitiveness of Automotive Industry: Evidence from Panel Data," Bulletin of Energy Economics (BEE), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 3(4), pages 194-202, December.
    5. Tommaso Ciarli & Maria Savona & Jodie Thorpe & Seife Ayele, 2018. "Innovation for Inclusive Structural Change. A Framework and Research Agenda," SPRU Working Paper Series 2018-04, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
    6. Olczyk, Magdalena, 2011. "Structural changes in the Polish economy - the analysis of input-output," MPRA Paper 33659, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Castellacci, Fulvio, 2006. "Innovation, diffusion and catching up in the fifth long wave," MPRA Paper 27521, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Carolina Castaldi & Alessandro Nuvolari, 2004. "Technological Revolutions and Economic Growth: The “Age of Steam” Reconsidered," LEM Papers Series 2004/11, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    9. Maria Savona & André Lorentz, 2005. "Demand and Technology Determinants of Structural Change and Tertiarisation: An Input-Output Structural Decomposition Analysis for four OECD Countries," LEM Papers Series 2005/25, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.

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