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Knowledge of catalan, public/prívate sector choice and earnings: Evidence from a double sample selection model

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  • Antonio di Paolo

    () (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona)

Abstract

This paper explores the earnings return to Catalan knowledge for public and private workers in Catalonia. In doing so, we allow for a double simultaneous selection process. We consider, on the one hand, the non-random allocation of workers into one sector or another, and on the other, the potential self-selection into Catalan proficiency. In addition, when correcting the earnings equations, we control for the correlation between the two selectivity rules. Our findings suggest that the apparent higher language return for public sector workers is entirely accounted for by selection effects, whereas knowledge of Catalan has a significant positive return in the private sector, which is somewhat higher when the selection processes are taken into account.

Suggested Citation

  • Antonio di Paolo, 2011. "Knowledge of catalan, public/prívate sector choice and earnings: Evidence from a double sample selection model," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 197(2), pages 9-35, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:hpe:journl:y:2011:v:197:i:2:p:9-35
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Sílvio Rendon, 2007. "The Catalan premium: language and employment in Catalonia," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(3), pages 669-686, July.
    8. Quella, Núria & Rendon, Silvio, 2008. "Occupational Selection in Multilingual Labor Markets," IZA Discussion Papers 3446, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Di Paolo & Aysit Tansel, 2015. "Returns to Foreign Language Skills in a Developing Country: The Case of Turkey," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(4), pages 407-421, April.
    2. repec:spr:izamig:v:7:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40176-017-0094-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Catalina Bolancé & Zuhair Bahraoui & Ramon Alemany, 2015. "Estimating extreme value cumulative distribution functions using bias-corrected kernel approaches," Working Papers XREAP2015-01, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Jan 2015.
    4. Anna Castañer & Mª Mercè Claramunt, 2014. "Optimal stop-loss reinsurance: a dependence analysis," Working Papers XREAP2014-04, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Apr 2014.
    5. Budría, Santiago & Swedberg, Pablo, 2012. "The Impact of Language Proficiency on Immigrants' Earnings in Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 6957, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Mercedes Ayuso & Montserrat Guillén & Jens Perch Nielsen, 2016. "Improving automobile insurance ratemaking using telematics: incorporating mileage and driver behaviour data," Working Papers XREAP2016-08, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Dec 2016.
    7. Antonio Manresa & Ferran Sancho, 2012. "Leontief versus Ghosh: two faces of the same coin," Working Papers XREAP2012-18, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Oct 2012.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Language; Sector Choice; Earnings; Simultaneous Selection; Catalonia.;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets
    • J70 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - General
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models

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