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Foodsheds and City Region Food Systems in Two West African Cities

Author

Listed:
  • Hanna Karg

    () (Physical Geography, Institute of Environmental Social Sciences and Geography, University of Freiburg, 79085 Freiburg, Germany)

  • Pay Drechsel

    () (International Water Management Institute, Battaramulla 10120, Sri Lanka)

  • Edmund K. Akoto-Danso

    () (Organic Plant Production & Agroecosystems Research in the Tropics and Subtropics, Universität Kassel, 37213 Witzenhausen, Germany)

  • Rüdiger Glaser

    () (Physical Geography, Institute of Environmental Social Sciences and Geography, University of Freiburg, 79085 Freiburg, Germany)

  • George Nyarko

    () (Faculty of Agriculture, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana)

  • Andreas Buerkert

    () (Organic Plant Production & Agroecosystems Research in the Tropics and Subtropics, Universität Kassel, 37213 Witzenhausen, Germany)

Abstract

In response to changing urban food systems, short supply chains have been advocated to meet urban food needs while building more sustainable urban food systems. Despite an increasing interest in urban food supply and the flows of food from production to consumption, there is a lack of empirical studies and methodologies which systematically analyse the actual proportion and nutritional significance of local and regional food supplied to urban markets. The aim of this empirical study therefore was to compare the geographical sources supplying food to the urban population (“foodsheds”) in Tamale, Ghana and Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, to record the supplied quantities and to assess the level of interaction between the sources and the respective city. The study was conducted over two years, covering the seasons of abundant and short supply, via traffic surveys on the access roads to the two cities, and in the Tamale markets, resulting altogether in more than 40,000 records of food flow. Results indicated that food sources were highly crop- and season-specific, ranging from one-dimensional to multi-dimensional foodsheds with diverse sources across seasons. Across the commodity-specific foodsheds, city region boundaries were established. Within the proposed city region a relatively large proportion of smallholders contributed to urban food supply, taking advantage of the proximity to urban markets. While food provided from within the city region offers certain place-based benefits, like the provision of fresh perishable crops, a larger geographical diversity of foodsheds appeared to enhance the resilience of urban food systems, such as against climate related production failures.

Suggested Citation

  • Hanna Karg & Pay Drechsel & Edmund K. Akoto-Danso & Rüdiger Glaser & George Nyarko & Andreas Buerkert, 2016. "Foodsheds and City Region Food Systems in Two West African Cities," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(12), pages 1-32, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:12:p:1175-:d:83759
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Amikuzuno, Joseph & Ihle, Rico, 2010. "Seasonal Asymmetric Price Transmission in Ghanaian Tomato Markets: Adapting Johansen’s Estimation Method," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 96814, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    2. Anne Bellows & Michael Hamm, 2001. "Local autonomy and sustainable development: Testing import substitution in more localized food systems," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 18(3), pages 271-284, September.
    3. Drechsel, Pay & Graefe, Sophie & Fink, Michael, 2007. "Rural-urban food, nutrient and virtual water flows in selected West African cities," IWMI Research Reports 44518, International Water Management Institute.
    4. Drechsel, Pay & Graefe, S. & Fink, M., 2007. "Rural-urban food, nutrient and virtual water flows in selected West African cities," IWMI Research Reports H040456, International Water Management Institute.
    5. Nicolas Depetris Chauvin & Francis Mulangu & Guido Porto, "undated". "Food Production and Consumption Trends in Sub-Saharan Africa: Prospects for the Transformation of the Agricultural Sector," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2012-011, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
    6. Haggblade, Steven & Longabaugh, Steven & Boughton, Duncan & Dembele, Niama Nango & Diallo, Boubacar Cisse & Staatz, John M. & Tschirley, David L., 2012. "Staple Food Market Sheds in West Africa," Food Security International Development Working Papers 121866, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Supee Teravaninthorn & Gaël Raballand, 2009. "Transport Prices and Costs in Africa : A Review of the International Corridors," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6610.
    8. Robinson, Elizabeth J. Z. & Kolavalli, Shashi L., 2010. "The case of tomato in Ghana: Marketing," GSSP working papers 20, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:5:p:1680-:d:148354 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:14:p:3876-:d:248985 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:agiwat:v:213:y:2019:i:c:p:760-772 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:882-:d:137137 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:31:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1057_s41287-018-0171-2 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    urban food systems; foodsheds; city region food systems; food flows; urban food supply; spatial analysis; GIS mapping; climate change;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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