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The Effects of Environmental Management Systems on Source Separation in the Work and Home Settings

Author

Listed:
  • Maria Andersson

    () (Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 100, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden)

  • Ola Eriksson

    () (Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, University of Gävle, 801 76 Gävle, Sweden)

  • Chris von Borgstede

    () (Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 100, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden)

Abstract

Measures that challenge the generation of waste are needed to address the global problem of the increasing volumes of waste that are generated in both private homes and workplaces. Source separation at the workplace is commonly implemented by environmental management systems (EMS). In the present study, the relationship between source separation at work and at home was investigated. A questionnaire that maps psychological and behavioural predictors of source separation was distributed to employees at different workplaces. The results show that respondents with awareness of EMS report higher levels of source separation at work, stronger environmental concern, personal and social norms, and perceive source separation to be less difficult. Furthermore, the results support the notion that after the adoption of EMS at the workplace, source separation at work spills over into source separation in the household. The potential implications for environmental management systems are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Andersson & Ola Eriksson & Chris von Borgstede, 2012. "The Effects of Environmental Management Systems on Source Separation in the Work and Home Settings," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(6), pages 1-17, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:6:p:1292-1308:d:18373
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Biel, Anders & Thogersen, John, 2007. "Activation of social norms in social dilemmas: A review of the evidence and reflections on the implications for environmental behaviour," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 93-112, January.
    2. Ajzen, Icek, 1991. "The theory of planned behavior," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 179-211, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Naoko Kaida & Kosuke Kaida, 2015. "Spillover effect of congestion charging on pro-environmental behavior," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 409-421, June.
    2. Anke Buhl & Susanne Blazejewski & Franziska Dittmer, 2016. "The More, the Merrier: Why and How Employee-Driven Eco-Innovation Enhances Environmental and Competitive Advantage," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(9), pages 1-17, September.
    3. Roberto Merli & Michele Preziosi & Ilaria Massa, 2014. "EMAS Regulation in Italian Clusters: Investigating the Involvement of Local Stakeholders," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(7), pages 1-21, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    source separation; attitudes; spill-over effect; environmental management; norms;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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