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The geography of research and development activity in the U.S

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  • Kristy Buzard
  • Gerald A. Carlino

Abstract

In the U.S., metropolitan areas contain the largest concentrations of people and jobs. Despite some drawbacks, these so-called agglomeration economies also have benefits, such as the cost savings that result from being close to suppliers and workers. Spatial concentration is even more pronounced among establishments that do basic research and development (R&D). In "The Geography of Research and Development Activity in the U.S.," Kristy Buzard and Jerry Carlino show that geographic concentration of R&D extends beyond locations such as Silicon Valley. In fact, many types of R&D establishments are highly concentrated geographically.

Suggested Citation

  • Kristy Buzard & Gerald A. Carlino, 2008. "The geography of research and development activity in the U.S," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q3, pages 1-11.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpbr:y:2008:i:q3:p:1-11
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Laurent Bergé & Nicolas Carayol, GREThA, UMR CNRS 5113, Université de Bordeaux & Pascale Roux, 2017. "How do inventor networks affect urban invention?," CREA Discussion Paper Series 17-03, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    2. Carlino, Gerald & Kerr, William R., 2015. "Agglomeration and Innovation," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    3. Carlino, Gerald A. & Carr, Jake & Hunt, Robert M. & Smith, Tony E., 2010. "The agglomeration of R&D labs," Working Papers 10-33, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    4. repec:bof:bofrdp:urn:nbn:fi:bof-201512111472 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Research and development;

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