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Sentiment Cyclicality

Author

Listed:
  • Orlando Gomes

    () (Lisbon Accounting and Business School (ISCAL/IPL) & Business Research Unit (UNIDE/ISCTE-IUL), Lisbon, Portugal)

Abstract

The paper investigates the dynamics of a model of sentiment switching. The model is built upon rumor propagation theory and it is designed to uncover, for a given population, the social process through which optimistic individuals might become pessimistic or the other way around. The outcome is a scenario of perpetual motion with the shares of optimistic and pessimistic agents varying persistently over time. On a second stage, the cyclical sentiments setup is attached to a mechanism of formation of expectations based on the notion of optimized rationality, leading to a description of the macro economy in which aggregate output and inflation exhibit sentiment driven fluctuations. The proposed model contributes to a recent strand of macroeconomic literature that recovers the Keynesian notions of animal spirits, market sentiments and waves of optimism and pessimism.

Suggested Citation

  • Orlando Gomes, 2015. "Sentiment Cyclicality," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 9(2), pages 104-134, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:aucocz:au2015_104
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Gertler & Jordi Gali & Richard Clarida, 1999. "The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1661-1707, December.
    2. Bofinger, Peter & Debes, Sebastian & Gareis, Johannes & Mayer, Eric, 2013. "Monetary policy transmission in a model with animal spirits and house price booms and busts," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 2862-2881.
    3. Matthias Lengnick & Hans-Werner Wohltmann, 2013. "Agent-based financial markets and New Keynesian macroeconomics: a synthesis," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 8(1), pages 1-32, April.
    4. De Grauwe, Paul, 2012. "Booms and busts in economic activity: A behavioral explanation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 484-501.
    5. Paul Grauwe, 2011. "Animal spirits and monetary policy," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 47(2), pages 423-457, June.
    6. Bidder, R.M. & Smith, M.E., 2012. "Robust animal spirits," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(8), pages 738-750.
    7. Geraats, Petra M., 1999. "Inflation and Its Variation: An Alternative Explanation," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt56b2g3vn, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    8. William Brock & Pietro Dindo & Cars Hommes, 2006. "Adaptive rational equilibrium with forward looking agents," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 2(3-4), pages 241-278.
    9. Mark Gertler & Jordi Gali & Richard Clarida, 1999. "The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1661-1707, December.
    10. Gomes, Orlando, 2012. "Rational thinking under costly information—Macroeconomic implications," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(3), pages 427-430.
    11. Dudek, Maciej K., 2010. "A consistent route to randomness," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 145(1), pages 354-381, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sentiments; animal spirits; business cycles; rumor propagation; New-Keynesian macroeconomics; optimized rationality;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations

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