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Export Structure, FDI and the Rapidity of Ireland’s Recovery from Crisis

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  • Frank Barry

    (Trinity College Dublin)

  • Adele Bergin

    (The Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

Abstract

The FDI-intensity of the Irish economy has been a frequent topic of contributions to The Economic and Social Review over the years. The paper begins by reviewing the FDI-related distortions that complicate the measurement of Irish economic performance. It then extends the analysis to discuss how these might affect the identification of the factors behind the strength and rapidity of the recent recovery. The measures underlying the ‘internal devaluation’ perspective are shown to be infected by these same distortions. The asymmetric characteristics of the Irish economy are argued to require that greater attention be paid to export structure than is standard in textbook macroeconomic analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Barry & Adele Bergin, 2019. "Export Structure, FDI and the Rapidity of Ireland’s Recovery from Crisis," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 50(4), pages 707-724.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:50:y:2019:i:4:p:707-724
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Whelan, Karl, 2014. "Ireland’s Economic Crisis: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 39(PB), pages 424-440.
    2. Desai, Mihir A. & Foley, C. Fritz & Hines, James Jr., 2006. "The demand for tax haven operations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(3), pages 513-531, February.
    3. Frank Barry & Michael B. Devereux, 2006. "A Theoretical Growth Model for Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 37(2), pages 245-262.
    4. John Fitzgerald, 2014. "Ireland’s Recovery from Crisis," CESifo Forum, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(02), pages 08-13, April.
    5. Frank Barry & Adele Bergin, 2012. "Inward Investment and Irish Exports over the Recession and Beyond," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(10), pages 1291-1304, October.
    6. Nicholas Crafts, 2014. "Ireland’s Medium-Term Growth Prospects: a Phoenix Rising?," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(1), pages 87-112.
    7. O'Brien, Derry & Scally, John, 2012. "Cost Competitiveness and Export Performance of the Irish Economy," Quarterly Bulletin Articles, Central Bank of Ireland, pages 86-102, July.
    8. John Romalis, 2007. "Capital Taxes, Trade Costs, and the Irish Miracle," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(2-3), pages 459-469, 04-05.
    9. Byrne, Stephen & O'Brien, Martin, 2015. "The Changing Nature of Irish Exports: Context, Causes and Consequences," Quarterly Bulletin Articles, Central Bank of Ireland, pages 58-72, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Keegan, Conor & Brick, Aoife & Bergin, Adele & Wren, Maev-Ann & Whyte, Richard & Henry, Edward, 2020. "Projections of expenditure for public hospitals in Ireland, 2018–2035, based on the Hippocrates Model," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS117.

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    Keywords

    exports; FDI; Ireland;
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