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A Survey of Explanations for the Celtic Tiger Boom

  • Eoin O'Malley

    ()

    (Institute for International Integration Studies, Trinity College Dublin)

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    This paper surveys the literature that attempts to explain what caused the Celtic Tiger boom. The suggested explanations that are covered include fiscal stabilisation, tax cuts, delayed convergence, privatisation and deregulation, strong growth in export markets, supply of labour, education, the single European market, EU structural funds, social partnership, foreign direct investment, the small/regional nature of the economy, Irish indigenous industry and some other explanations. It is argued that some of these suggested explanations are not very convincing or important.

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    File URL: http://www.tcd.ie/iiis/documents/discussion/pdfs/iiisdp417.pdf
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    Paper provided by IIIS in its series The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series with number iiisdp417.

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    Length: 32 pages
    Date of creation: Oct 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp417
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    1. John Romalis, 2007. "Capital Taxes, Trade Costs, and the Irish Miracle," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(2-3), pages 459-469, 04-05.
    2. Bradley, John & Whelan, Karl, 1997. "The Irish expansionary fiscal contraction: A tale from one small European economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 175-201, April.
    3. Benjamin Powell, 2003. "Economic Freedom and Growth: The Case of the Celtic Tiger," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 22(3), pages 431-448, Winter.
    4. McCoy, Daniel & Duffy, David & Bergin, Adele & Cullen, Joseph, 2002. "Quarterly Economic Commentary, Winter 2002," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number QEC20024, March.
    5. Duffy, David & FitzGerald, John & Kearney, Ide & Shortall, Fergal, 1997. "Medium-Term Review 1997-2003, No. 6," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number MTR06, March.
    6. Frances Ruane & Peter J. Buckley, 2006. "Foreign Direct Investment in Ireland: Policy Implications for Emerging Economies," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp113, IIIS.
    7. McGuinness, Seamus & Kelly, Elish & O'Connell, Philip J., 2008. "The Impact of Wage Bargaining Regime on Firm-Level Competitiveness and Wage Inequality: The Case of Ireland," Papers WP266, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    8. Bergin, Adele & Cullen, Joe & Duffy, David & FitzGerald, John & Kearney, Ide & McCoy, Daniel, 2003. "Medium-Term Review 2003-2010, No. 9," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number MTR09, March.
    9. Bergin, Adele & Conefrey, Thomas & FitzGerald, John & Kearney, Ide, 2009. "The Behaviour of the Irish Economy: Insights from the HERMES Macro-Economic Model," Papers WP287, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    10. Conefrey, Thomas & Fitz Gerald, John D., 2011. "The macro-economic impact of changing the rate of corporation tax," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 991-999, May.
    11. John Considine & David Duffy, 2007. "Tales of Expansionary Fiscal Contractions in Two European Countries: Hindsight and Foresight," Working Papers 120, National University of Ireland Galway, Department of Economics, revised 2007.
    12. Frank Barry, 2000. "Convergence is not Automatic: Lessons from Ireland for Central and Eastern Europe," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(10), pages 1379-1394, October.
    13. Frank Barry & Michael B. Devereux, 2006. "A Theoretical Growth Model for Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 37(2), pages 245-262.
    14. David E. Bloom & David Canning, 2003. "Contraception and the Celtic Tiger," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 34(3), pages 229–247.
    15. McCoy, Daniel & Duffy, David & Bergin, Adele & Eakins, John & MacCoille, C, 2002. "Quarterly Economic Commentary, Summer 2002," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number QEC20022, March.
    16. Patrick Honohan & Brendan Walsh, 2002. "Catching Up with the Leaders: The Irish Hare," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 33(1), pages 1-78.
    17. Barry, Frank, 2009. "Social Partnership, Competitiveness and Exit from Fiscal Crisis," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 40(1), pages 1-14.
    18. Barrett, Alan & Kearney, Ide & McCarthy, Yvonne, 2006. "Quarterly Economic Commentary, Winter 2006," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number QEC20064, March.
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