IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Foreign Direct Investment in Ireland: Policy Implications for Emerging Economies


  • Peter J. Buckley
  • Frances Ruane


Ireland's success in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) provides guidance for emerging economies. The key to Ireland's success is its consistency of policy towards FDI. Ireland's success suggests that emerging countries should be proactive in seeking FDI, offer a package of incentives that is enterprise-centred yet is sufficiently selective to build self-sustaining clusters. Policy consistency is important to inward investors and this can be traded off against selectivity and monitoring of performance. Copyright 2006 The Authors Journal compilation 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter J. Buckley & Frances Ruane, 2006. "Foreign Direct Investment in Ireland: Policy Implications for Emerging Economies," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(11), pages 1611-1628, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:29:y:2006:i:11:p:1611-1628

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Bayraktar, Nihal & El Aynaoui, Karim, 2008. "Roads out of poverty? Assessing the links between aid, public investment, growth, and poverty reduction," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 277-295, June.
    2. Smith, Lisa C. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 2000. "Explaining child malnutrition in developing countries: a cross-country analysis," Research reports 111, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Pritchett, Lant, 1996. "Mind your P's and Q's : the cost of public investment is not the value of public capital," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1660, The World Bank.
    4. Ravallion, Martin, 2004. "Pro-poor growth : A primer," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3242, The World Bank.
    5. Satya R. Chakravarty, 2003. "A Generalized Human Development Index," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(1), pages 99-114, February.
    6. Arvind Subramanian & Raghuram Rajan, 2005. "What Undermines Aid’s Impact on Growth?," IMF Working Papers 05/126, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Luc Christiaensen & Lionel Demery & Stefano Paternostro, 2003. "Macro and Micro Perspectives of Growth and Poverty in Africa," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(3), pages 317-347, December.
    8. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Nabli, Mustapha K. & Yousef, Tarik M., 2005. "Public infrastructure and private investment in the Middle East and North Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3661, The World Bank.
    9. Baliamoune-Lutz, Mina & Lutz, Stefan H., 2004. "The contribution of income, social capital, and institutions to human well-being in Africa," ZEI Working Papers B 07-2004, University of Bonn, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies.
    10. Pinto Moreira, Emmanuel & Bayraktar, Nihal, 2005. "A macroeconomic framework for quantifying growth and poverty reduction strategies in Niger," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3506, The World Bank.
    11. Christophe Hurlin, 2005. "The productivy Effects of Public Capital in Developing Countries," Post-Print halshs-00257440, HAL.
    12. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2003. "Halving Global Poverty," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 3-22, Summer.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:manint:v:54:y:2014:i:3:d:10.1007_s11575-014-0202-y is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Romualdas Ginevičius & Agnė Šimelytė, 2011. "Government incentives directed towards foreign direct investment: a case of central and eastern europe," Journal of Business Economics and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 435-450, May.
    3. Eoin O'Malley, 2012. "A Survey of Explanations for the Celtic Tiger Boom," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp417, IIIS.
    4. Kate Hynes & Yum K. Kwan & Anthony Foley, 2017. "Local linkages: The interdependence of foreign and domestic firms," Working Papers 201712, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    5. Crafts, Nicholas, 2008. "The Celtic Tiger In Historical And International Perspective," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 867, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    6. David Bailey & Helena Lenihan & Ajit Singh, 2008. "Tiger, Tiger, Burning Bright? Industrial Policy Lessons from Ireland and East Asia for Small African Economies," Working Papers wp374, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    7. World Bank, 2009. "Macedonia - Moving to Faster and More Inclusive Growth A Country Economic Memorandum : Main Report and Annex," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3067, The World Bank.
    8. Léo Le Mener, 2015. "Heterogeneous agrifood firms, agricultural prices and access to foreign markets," Working Papers SMART - LERECO 15-11, INRA UMR SMART-LERECO.
    9. Liu, Bih Jane, 2011. "MNEs and Local Linkages: Evidence from Taiwanese Affiliates," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 633-647, April.
    10. David Bailey & Helena Lenihan & Ajit Singh, 2009. "Lessons for African Economies from Irish and East Asian Industrial Policy," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 357-382, December.
    11. Nicholas Crafts, 2014. "Ireland’s Medium-Term Growth Prospects: a Phoenix Rising?," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(1), pages 87-112.
    12. Teague, Paul, 2009. "Committing to Economic Openness and Building Domestic Institutional Capabilities Keywords: Ireland, economic growth, economic development, inward investment, economic systems," WIDER Working Paper Series 024, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Olubunmi Ipinnaiye & Declan Dineen & Helena Lenihan, 2017. "Drivers of SME performance: a holistic and multivariate approach," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 883-911, April.
    14. Bose, Pinaki & Jetter, Michael, 2012. "Liberalization and tax amnesty in a developing economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 761-765.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:29:y:2006:i:11:p:1611-1628. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.