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Network Social Capital and Labour Market Outcomes: Evidence For Ireland

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  • Gerard Brady

    (IBEC, Dublin)

Abstract

Using data from the International Social Survey Programme 2008 this paper tests empirically the effects of network social capital on Irish employment outcomes, while attempting to account for possible endogeneity. We allow the effects of social networks to vary for different groups and across different localities. We find that an individual’s “weak ties” or acquaintances matter for employment outcomes, whereas their “strong ties”, for example, their friends and family, are less important. The effects, however, vary across age and location. We also find no evidence that the relationship between social participation and employment is endogenous. These findings are discussed with relevance for future research and policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerard Brady, 2015. "Network Social Capital and Labour Market Outcomes: Evidence For Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 46(2), pages 163-195.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:46:y:2015:i:2:p:163-195
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Deguilhem, Thibaud & Berrou, Jean-Philippe & Combarnous, François, 2017. "Using your ties to get a worse job? The differential effects of social networks on quality of employment: Evidence from Colombia," MPRA Paper 78628, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Tom Sander & Biruta Sloka, 2015. "Does the Use of Facebook Influence the Exchange of Information on Social Networking," Proceedings of FIKUSZ 2015,in: Jolán Velencei (ed.), Proceedings of FIKUSZ '15, pages 185-202 Óbuda University, Keleti Faculty of Business and Management.

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    Keywords

    social capital; labour market; Ireland;

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