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Cyclical synchronization in the EMU along the financial crisis: An interpretation of the conflicting signals

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  • Jose Ramon Cancelo

    (University of A Coruña)

Abstract

We analyze how cyclical synchronization in the EMU evolved since the onset of the current financial crisis. The standard measures of cyclical correlation suggest that while the cycle of the euro area became more aligned with the cycles of other developed economies, the EMU itself apparently entered into a phase of cyclical divergence. We show that as a matter of fact the bulk of the member states remained closely aligned, and the seeming decline in synchronization is due to a few countries decoupling from the euro area. Next we present empirical evidence that the foundations that explain the evolution of the national cycles against the EMU aggregate through the crisis were already latent in 2007. Greece and Ireland deviate from the general pattern, the former because of its loose fiscal policy all along the period 2000-2007, and the latter due to the flexibility of its labor market.

Suggested Citation

  • Jose Ramon Cancelo, 2012. "Cyclical synchronization in the EMU along the financial crisis: An interpretation of the conflicting signals," European Journal of Government and Economics, Europa Grande, vol. 1(1), pages 86-100, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:egr:ejge00:v:1:i:1:p:86-100
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Papageorgiou, Theofanis & Michaelides, Panayotis G. & Milios, John G., 2010. "Business cycles synchronization and clustering in Europe (1960-2009)," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 62(5), pages 419-470, September.
    2. Paul de Grauwe & Francesco Paolo Mongelli, 2005. "Endogeneities of Optimum Currency Areas: What brings Countries Sharing a Single Currency Closer together?," Working Papers de Economia (Economics Working Papers) 29, Departamento de Economia, Gestão e Engenharia Industrial, Universidade de Aveiro.
    3. Carlo Altavilla, 2004. "Do EMU Members Share the Same Business Cycle?," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(5), pages 869-896, December.
    4. Jean Imbs, 2004. "Trade, Finance, Specialization, and Synchronization," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(3), pages 723-734, August.
    5. Michael J. Artis & Jarko Fidrmuc & Johann Scharler, 2008. "The transmission of business cycles," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 16(3), pages 559-582, July.
    6. Mark Mink & Jan P.A.M. Jacobs & Jakob de Haan, 2012. "Measuring coherence of output gaps with an application to the euro area," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(2), pages 217-236, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Theophilos Papadimitriou & Periklis Gogas & Georgios Sarantitis, 2016. "Convergence of European Business Cycles: A Complex Networks Approach," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 47(2), pages 97-119, February.
    2. Diego Varela & Giacomo Benedetto & Jose Manuel Sanchez-Santos, 2014. "Editorial statement: Lessons from Goodhart’s law for the management of the journal," European Journal of Government and Economics, Europa Grande, vol. 3(2), pages 100-103, December.
    3. Escañuela Romana, Ignacio, 2013. "¿Convergen los ciclos económicos de los estados de la zona euro?: evidencia empírica
      [Do Economic Cycles Converge In The Euro Zone?: Empirical Evidence]
      ," MPRA Paper 48145, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    international business cycles; euro area; cyclical convergence; asymmetric responses;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles

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