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Bedouin Adaptation to the Last 15-Years of Drought (1995–2010) in the North Coastal Zone of Egypt: Continuity or Rupture?

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  • Alary, Véronique
  • Hassan, Ferial
  • Daoud, Ibrahim
  • Aboul Naga, Adel
  • Osman, Mona A.
  • Bastianelli, Denis
  • Lescoat, Philippe
  • Moselhy, Naeem
  • Tourrand, Jean-François

Abstract

Following the tribal allocation of land in the 1920s and the development of agriculture in the wadi area, the last six decades have seen the settlement of the majority of Bedouin tribes in Egypt. In the two last decades, the Bedouin in the Coastal Zone of the Western Desert had to cope with a severe 15-year drought combined with major changes in link with tourism, urbanization, and agricultural development. Using data collected in surveys and interviews, we show that the adaptive processes of the Bedouin are embedded in their social organization and in their ability to adopt new activities.

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  • Alary, Véronique & Hassan, Ferial & Daoud, Ibrahim & Aboul Naga, Adel & Osman, Mona A. & Bastianelli, Denis & Lescoat, Philippe & Moselhy, Naeem & Tourrand, Jean-François, 2014. "Bedouin Adaptation to the Last 15-Years of Drought (1995–2010) in the North Coastal Zone of Egypt: Continuity or Rupture?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 125-137.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:62:y:2014:i:c:p:125-137
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.05.004
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    2. Dina Najjar & Boubaker Dhehibi & Aden Aw-Hassan & Abderrahim Bentaibi, 2017. "Climate Change, Gender, Decision-Making Power, and Migration into the Saiss Region of Morocco," Working Papers 1102, Economic Research Forum, revised 06 Jan 2017.

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