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Public Service Provision under Conditions of Insufficient Citizen Demand: Insights from the Urban Sanitation Sector in Indonesia

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  • Winters, Matthew S.
  • Karim, Abdul Gaffar
  • Martawardaya, Berly

Abstract

Indonesia drastically lags behind other countries in Southeast Asia and at similar levels of development in supplying urban wastewater sanitation. We use case studies from three cities in Indonesia to better understand why wastewater services are underprovided. We find strong demand-side constraints that interact with supply-side decision making. After comparing the urban wastewater sector in Indonesia to the health, education, and rural wastewater sectors in the country and to the urban wastewater sector in other Southeast Asian countries, we conclude by arguing for an increase in educational programs that will foment citizen demands on the government.

Suggested Citation

  • Winters, Matthew S. & Karim, Abdul Gaffar & Martawardaya, Berly, 2014. "Public Service Provision under Conditions of Insufficient Citizen Demand: Insights from the Urban Sanitation Sector in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 31-42.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:60:y:2014:i:c:p:31-42
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.03.017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maung Aung Myoe, 2015. "Myanmar’s China Policy since 2011: Determinants and Directions," Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, Institute of Asian Studies, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, Hamburg, vol. 34(2), pages 21-54.
    2. Batley, Richard & Mcloughlin, Claire, 2015. "The Politics of Public Services: A Service Characteristics Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 275-285.
    3. McGranahan, Gordon, 2015. "Realizing the Right to Sanitation in Deprived Urban Communities: Meeting the Challenges of Collective Action, Coproduction, Affordability, and Housing Tenure," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 242-253.
    4. Ricks, Jacob I., 2016. "Building Participatory Organizations for Common Pool Resource Management: Water User Group Promotion in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 34-47.
    5. McGranahan, Gordon & Mitlin, Diana, 2016. "Learning from Sustained Success: How Community-Driven Initiatives to Improve Urban Sanitation Can Meet the Challenges," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 307-317.
    6. Matthew S. Winters & Matthew Cawvey, 2015. "Governance Obstacles to Geothermal Energy Development in Indonesia," Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, Institute of Asian Studies, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, Hamburg, vol. 34(1), pages 27-56.
    7. Fossati, Diego, 2016. "Beyond “Good Governance”: The Multi-level Politics of Health Insurance for the Poor in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 291-306.

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