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The Politics of Public Services: A Service Characteristics Approach

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  • Batley, Richard
  • Mcloughlin, Claire

Abstract

Politics is widely regarded as affecting and being affected by the performance of public services, yet little research differentiates between services in exploring these effects. The article addresses this gap by proposing a framework for understanding and comparing the politics of different services. It identifies how the nature of the good, type of market failure, tasks involved in delivery, and demand for a service—hitherto regarded largely as economic and managerial concerns—affect political commitment, organizational control, and user power. Policy responses can be targeted to address service characteristics where they present opportunities or constraints to better services.

Suggested Citation

  • Batley, Richard & Mcloughlin, Claire, 2015. "The Politics of Public Services: A Service Characteristics Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 275-285.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:74:y:2015:i:c:p:275-285
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.05.018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Clarke, Ian & Klerkx, Laurens & Ramirez, Matias, 2016. "Learning and innovation in developing economy clusters: Comparing private and non-profit intermediaries in cluster governance," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 16712, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:158-169 is not listed on IDEAS

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