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Detecting Gender and Racial Discrimination in Hiring Through Monitoring Intermediation Services: The Case of Selected Occupations in Metropolitan Lima, Peru

Author

Listed:
  • Moreno, Martín
  • Ñopo, Hugo
  • Saavedra, Jaime
  • Torero, Máximo

Abstract

Inspired by audit studies methodology, we monitored a job intermediation service in Peru to detect gender and racial discrimination in hiring. We capture individual racial information using the approach of Ñopo, Saavedra, and Torero (2007), enabling a richer exploration of racial differences. Overall, the study finds discriminatory treatment in hiring only when comparing groups with extremely different observable racial characteristics. We detect discriminatory treatment for female Indigenous applicants in secretarial positions. In terms of aimed wages, females tend to ask for wages 7% below those of males with comparable skills (although this has no negative impact on wages at hiring).

Suggested Citation

  • Moreno, Martín & Ñopo, Hugo & Saavedra, Jaime & Torero, Máximo, 2012. "Detecting Gender and Racial Discrimination in Hiring Through Monitoring Intermediation Services: The Case of Selected Occupations in Metropolitan Lima, Peru," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 315-328.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:40:y:2012:i:2:p:315-328
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2011.05.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James J. Heckman, 1998. "Detecting Discrimination," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 101-116, Spring.
    2. Glenn W. Harrison & John A. List, 2004. "Field Experiments," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1009-1055, December.
    3. John Yinger, 1998. "Evidence on Discrimination in Consumer Markets," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 23-40, Spring.
    4. Hugo Ñopo & Jaime Saavedra & Máximo Torero, 2007. "Ethnicity and Earnings in a Mixed-Race Labor Market," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55, pages 709-734.
    5. P. A. Riach & J. Rich, 2002. "Field Experiments of Discrimination in the Market Place," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 480-518, November.
    6. Cecilia Rouse & Claudia Goldin, 2000. "Orchestrating Impartiality: The Impact of "Blind" Auditions on Female Musicians," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 715-741, September.
    7. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
    8. van Beek, Krijn W. H. & Koopmans, Carl C. & van Praag, Bernard M. S., 1997. "Shopping at the labour market: A real tale of fiction," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 295-317, February.
    9. Coate, Stephen & Loury, Glenn C, 1993. "Will Affirmative-Action Policies Eliminate Negative Stereotypes?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1220-1240, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Galarza, Francisco B. & Yamada, Gustavo, 2014. "Labor Market Discrimination in Lima, Peru: Evidence from a Field Experiment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 83-94.
    2. David Neumark, 2016. "Experimental Research on Labor Market Discrimination," NBER Working Papers 22022, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Bart Capeau & Lieve Eeman & Steven Groenez & Miet Lamberts, 2012. "Standardised Scores as a Way to measure and Compare Discrimination Across Dimensions," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2012-022, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. Francisco B. Galarza, 2017. "Trust and Trustworthiness in College: An Experimental Analysis," Working Papers 17-03, Centro de Investigación, Universidad del Pacífico.
    5. Bart Capeau & Lieve Eeman & Steven Groenez & Miet Lamberts, 2012. "Two concepts of discrimination: inequality of opportunity versus unequal treatment of equals," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2012-021, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

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