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The Decline in Intergenerational Mobility in Post-Socialism: Evidence from the Bulgarian Case

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  • Hertz, Tom
  • Meurs, Mieke
  • Selcuk, Sibel

Abstract

Summary We examine changes in the statistical association between parents' and children's schooling in one post-socialist country: Bulgaria. We document its near-doubling between 1995 and 2001. For children of less-educated parents, this produced an absolute decline in average attainment. These children were educated during a period of economic depression and significant reductions in public spending, which led to school closures and shortages of materials, along with increases in out-of-pocket costs. We conclude that the economic and fiscal crisis of the 1990s led to a sharp decline in educational mobility. This may have relevance for other countries experiencing similar economic shocks.

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  • Hertz, Tom & Meurs, Mieke & Selcuk, Sibel, 2009. "The Decline in Intergenerational Mobility in Post-Socialism: Evidence from the Bulgarian Case," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 739-752, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:3:p:739-752
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    Cited by:

    1. Binzel, Christine & Carvalho, Jean-Paul, 2013. "Education, Social Mobility and Religious Movements: A Theory of the Islamic Revival in Egypt," IZA Discussion Papers 7259, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. repec:bla:econpa:v:36:y:2017:i:3:p:335-350 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Nicolas Fleury & Fabrice Gilles, 2015. "A meta-regression analysis on intergenerational transmission of education: publication bias and genuine empirical effect," TEPP Working Paper 2015-02, TEPP.
    4. Riphahn, Regina T. & Trübswetter, Parvati, 2011. "The intergenerational transmission of educational attainment in East and West Germany," IAB Discussion Paper 201104, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Tilman Brück & Damir Esenaliev, 2013. "Post-Socialist Transition and the Intergenerational Transmission of Education in Kyrgyzstan," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1284, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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