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Home parking convenience, household car usage, and implications to residential parking policies

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  • Guo, Zhan

Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of home parking convenience on households' car usage, and the implications to residential parking policies. A random sample of 840 households is selected from a travel survey in the New York City region, and their home parking types are identified through Google Street View. It found that with the same car ownership level, households without off-street parking used cars much less, and relied more on alternative modes than those with off-street parking. For households with access to both garage and street parking, those who use the handy street parking tend to make more car tours than those who do not. In general, convenient home parking encourages households' car usage. Policy implications to the minimum off-street parking requirement, residents parking permit, street cleaning, and new urbanism neighborhood design are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Guo, Zhan, 2013. "Home parking convenience, household car usage, and implications to residential parking policies," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 97-106.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:29:y:2013:i:c:p:97-106
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2013.04.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Christiansen, Petter & Engebretsen, Øystein & Fearnley, Nils & Usterud Hanssen, Jan, 2017. "Parking facilities and the built environment: Impacts on travel behaviour," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 198-206.
    2. Guo, Zhan & McDonnell, Simon, 2013. "Curb parking pricing for local residents: An exploration in New York City based on willingness to pay," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 186-198.
    3. Sultana, Selima, 2015. "Factors associated with students' parking-pass purchase decisions: Evidence from an American University," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 65-75.

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