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The evidence base for parking policies--a review

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  • Marsden, Greg

Abstract

Parking policy is one of the key links between transport and land-use policy. Parking policies are often compromised in their effectiveness due to the perceived tension between three of the objectives that parking supports: regeneration, restraint and revenue. In particular the belief that parking restraint measures could damage the attractiveness of city centres to both retail and commercial enterprises limits the political acceptability of pricing policies and planning. This paper presents a review of the evidence base upon which commuter, leisure and shopping and residential parking policies are based. Whilst underdeveloped, the literature suggests that greater attention should be given to analysing and presenting the accessibility impacts that different parking restraint measures have on travelers of all modes. The research base in many instances does not support, or provides evidence counter to, the assumption that parking restraint makes centres less attractive. Further disaggregate work is needed to understand how context specific these findings might be.

Suggested Citation

  • Marsden, Greg, 2006. "The evidence base for parking policies--a review," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 447-457, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:13:y:2006:i:6:p:447-457
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